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Recommendations

Recommendations

  • Cheryl Bear:
    10 Jul. 2021
    In the dying world of journalism, can these two make it through as they battle technology? Thought provoking and well done.
  • Eric Pfeffinger:
    28 Apr. 2021
    It's a grounded relationship drama, except when it's brainy speculative sci-fi, except when it's deft verbal comedy, except when it's chilling technohorror. A smart and urgent play with tantalizing design possibilities and some visceral moments that really make me want to see it fully staged.
  • Emma Goldman-Sherman:
    14 Apr. 2021
    What a wonderful way to address the loneliness of our world and its technology, how tech that should bring us together is tearing us apart, and how it plays out in this moving and very funny play! Thank you Deborah Yarchun for this deep exploration of how we connect and disconnect with each other. Truly captures the anxiety of our time.
  • Elizabeth A. M. Keel:
    10 Apr. 2021
    This play, y'all. It voices so many of the little fears and microaggressions spurred on by the encroaching technology in our lives. (The homage to Gas Light in the form of a smart lightbulb is stunning.) And amidst the terrifying automation is a streak of delightful theatricality, with quick changes between VR and real life, animal transformations, and the puppetry behind the bionic arms. A definite conversation starter! This is vivid sci-fi.
  • Nick Malakhow:
    21 Feb. 2021
    A beautiful, funny, incisive, unsettling, and, above all, human exploration of the ways technology has impacted our ability to connect with one another--for the better and the worse! The sci-fi world feels effortlessly woven without a hint of capital E "Exposition," and both the technological and emotional realities of this future are well rendered. The examination of Irene and David's marriage, the heart of the play, is sad and sharp and funny all at once. It neither condemns nor excuses either of them. The titular primate, Atlas, is a subtle perfect metaphor/counterpoint for the human relationships on display.
  • Doug DeVita:
    28 Sep. 2020
    Deborah Yarchun's cautionary ATLAS, THE LONELY GIBBON paints a pretty terrifying picture of where we're headed in our increasingly tech-dependent world; among many lines that resonate, this one stood out for me: "You know, what’s wrong with using a switch with a lightbulb? With turning a key? With touching things?"

    Disturbing, funny, and brilliant, this play needs to be produced and seen. And for once, I'm beginning to see the benefits of being a luddite.
  • Sarah Cho:
    1 Sep. 2020
    What a brilliantly funny play! I highly recommend reading this deeply thoughtful and imaginative play. The play taps into themes of technology, virtual reality, and more importantly, human connections. Deborah knows how to make our relationship to technology theatrical. As a reader, I really connected with the world at a visceral level. I could also imagine designers and Prop masters having a field day with this. Read this play!!