• Recommend
  • Download
  • Save to Reading List

Recommendations

Recommendations

  • Cheryl Bear:
    28 Jun. 2021
    A thought provoking play that goes deep into the process of getting pregnant, technology and the moral questions that arise in society. Well done.
  • National New Play Network:
    9 Mar. 2021
    Babel by Jacqueline Goldfinger is receiving a National New Play Network Rolling World Premiere. The partnering NNPN Member Theaters are Unicorn Theatre (Kansas City, MO), Theatre Exile (Philadelphia, PA), and two more to be announced.
  • Ross Tedford Kendall:
    16 Nov. 2020
    A fantastic play that hits so many points square. Babel is so plausible in its conceit, that acts taken in the name of the greater good cause so much pain and trouble, and yet the characters are still conflicted on whether those acts were worth it. This conflict drives the story to a fantastic conclusion. The dialog is great, the characters ring as real humans. This entire play is a masterpiece.
  • Maximillian Gill:
    10 Apr. 2020
    Like the best speculative fiction, Goldfinger's play examines how a world founded on different principles affects people on the most human levels and extrapolates forward from our current reality. Here we have a utopia that is revealed to conceal the elements of a dystopia. We learn the darker side through the process of understanding the concerns of a set of characters whom we can't help but form strong bonds with thanks to Goldfinger's assured dialogue. Questions of nature vs. nurture are examined and late-act reveals force us to re-evaluate the characters and the plausible world they inhabit. Impressive work.
  • Jerry Polner:
    2 Apr. 2020
    Babel is a stunning and shattering story of two couples trying to have babies that will pass society's new test for perfection. Not a single line is out of place in this brilliant, incisive look at our very near future.
  • Greg Vovos:
    12 Mar. 2020
    A powerful, poignant, inventive play that brilliantly uses the future to speak to today. Characters with depth, and a story that moves at the perfect pace to its explosive, inevitable ending. Beautifully crafted. I would love to direct this piece.
  • Nelson Diaz-Marcano:
    25 Feb. 2020
    Oh man, there’s not much I can say that haven’t been said about this highly recommended play besides that there’s a good reason it has these many recommendations. The work is brilliant, unique and will make many a season if theater knows what’s good.
  • Philip Middleton Williams:
    22 Feb. 2020
    We often use the expression "in a perfect world," but we never really imagine what that means. Jacqueline Goldfinger has imagined a world where perfection is pre-determined by law, but that also should include the lesson of "be careful what you wish for." The questions that are raised and left for us to decide are both world-changing and extremely personal. The lyrical way "Babel" approaches them is masterful in both tone and character; you will immediately connect with them and know their world. What an extraordinary piece of theatre.
  • Dave Osmundsen:
    22 Feb. 2020
    Add my voice to the well-deserved praise for this play! Goldfinger has written a compelling, thought-provoking, complex, and horrifying futuristic tale here. What happens when we begin to make moves towards a more "perfect" society? How does that society decide who gets born and who they may be better off without? Goldfinger raises so many great points, and yet the play never feels didactic. You always have great insight into who these characters are and their relationship to each other. I really hope to see this play staged at some point. It deserves to be seen!
  • Chris Gacinski:
    16 Feb. 2020
    This is hands down one of the most unique plays I’ve ever set my eyes on. Goldfinger creates a future that’s as interesting as it is horrifying. From a very creative use of personification, to the Haruki Murakami-esque world Goldfinger vividly paints, this piece is captivating and attention grabbing until the end. This would be something I’d love to see on stage, and something I will read again in the future. What a play.

Pages