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Recommendations

Recommendations

  • Jessie Salsbury:
    18 Feb. 2018
    What is incredible about Grief is the structure and the possibilities, as another (Rachael Carnes) has commented. In this short play, we see worry, we see others coming into the circle, and we see a repeat of the cycle. I wanted to read it just based on the description "The play is a four-page template and may be repeated as needed." A well done work, but how terrible is it that we have a template of pain that we may use for current and future tragedies? An inventive idea that can be modified/reborn with each new performance.
  • Greg Burdick:
    17 Feb. 2018
    Sometimes, life delivers us moments where there are no words. In the opening moments of “Grief,” there is none. And Soltero-Brown doesn’t need any... a nameless character agonizes alone in silence. And we feel it. But when others begin to arrive, things don’t get any better - in fact, it becomes exponentially harder to take. This play challenges us to find the words, and to speak up.
  • Rachael Carnes:
    16 Feb. 2018
    This evocative meditation is all-too timely and relevant. Soltero-Brown's empathetic, human connection between and among his characters is in such good form here — And it hurts. This is a world I don't want to know about, but we must. The writer says that the play is a template that could be repeated as needed. What if, for example, the play were delivered as a mournful round, with more and more cast members added as it progressed? The resulting cacophony might echo some of the sadness in our hearts as we try to comprehend unimaginable horror and loss.

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