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Recommendations

Recommendations

  • John Weagly:
    13 Jul. 2019
    There's a lot going on in this thoughtful short play.
  • Cheryl Bear:
    2 Jul. 2019
    We can't ignore or shut off our hearts when it comes to the well being of animals. They need us and there's a powerful relationship that exists between us. Brilliantly done.
  • Liz Dooley:
    30 Jun. 2019
    The central relationship in this play, between the gorilla and Myra, is so strong, and made stronger by the fact that it’s fed through casting, interaction, and performance—all without needing to make the closeness between the two explicit. Enough is said, or hinted at, to make both the tone and character dynamics at once clear and hauntingly ambiguous—that goes double for the ending, which evokes a sense of dread simply by implication. A haunting exploration on the effect that humans and animals have on each other.
  • Rey Dabalsa:
    7 May. 2019
    Powerful commentary on the effect animals can have on humans. Myra is so touched by the gorilla she travels half way around the world to make sure it's "safe" while in its natural habitat. The play masterfully poses the question: does a zoo keep animals in or does it really keep dangers out? It is rare to find a play which includes a human actor playing an animal where the animal doesn't devolve into some stereotype or some caricature of itself. In a rather subtle way, O'Grady touches upon several current issues plaguing the animal conservation movement. Highly recommend!
  • Greg Hovanesian:
    14 Jul. 2018
    When adults visit a zoo, it is hard for them not to feel pangs of sadness. Unlike children, adults understand that a zoo is an approximation of a real world, a world built into the confines of an exhibit. But in The Gorilla, O’Grady makes us wonder: is our world as ‘real’ as we think? Is the love we experience ‘real’, or do we change ourselves to make it ‘real’? And do ‘real’ wild places still exist in the confines of our world, surrounded by guns and poachers? This play asks difficult questions, yet remains heart-warming and hopeful.