Syd

Published by SMITH SCRIPTS. Two Acts (~ 120 mins). On the evening of Sunday, June 24th, 1973, thirty-two men perished in a fire at The Upstairs Lounge, a sanctuary bar for working-class homosexual men in New Orleans. On that same evening, just several blocks north, nearly a dozen women, including a gifted young nursing student named Sydney (Syd) Trahan, were taken into custody and charged with lewd and...
Published by SMITH SCRIPTS. Two Acts (~ 120 mins). On the evening of Sunday, June 24th, 1973, thirty-two men perished in a fire at The Upstairs Lounge, a sanctuary bar for working-class homosexual men in New Orleans. On that same evening, just several blocks north, nearly a dozen women, including a gifted young nursing student named Sydney (Syd) Trahan, were taken into custody and charged with lewd and lascivious conduct for dancing together at Brady’s, a notorious lesbian bar in the French Quarter. Hopeful that the deadly fire and the controversy surrounding its multiple victims might overshadow Syd’s arrest, Bud, a reputable blacksmith, and Helen, a God-fearing woman, do everything in their power to curtail the impact of their daughter’s transgression on their seemingly near perfect lives.​
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Syd

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  • Paul Smith:
    6 Jun. 2021
    This powerful and insightful play gives the audience a wealth of questions to ponder and thoughts to filter. Craig Houk's writing is seemingly effortless in it's ability to reach into every corner of each character. A memorable and dynamic piece of story-telling which will stay in the mind long after the curtain has fallen.
  • Donald E. Baker:
    30 Apr. 2021
    Too many people interpret "made in God's image" as "God hates the same people we do." Almost half a century later there are still parents who reject their children, believing that is what God would have them do, and children who are forced to separate themselves from those who should love them. Craig Houk explores these family dynamics in a dramatic and relatable way that will prompt audiences to reconsider their own relationships. The play reads well and would be impactful on stage. Highly recommended.
  • David Hansen:
    22 Apr. 2021
    How the parents either do or do not come to terms with who their children are is at the root of this tale. Living in a more accepting place and time, it is difficult to imagine the kind of murderous hatred people can feel, even toward their own children. Each parent self-defines as Christian, though each has a different idea of exactly what that means. This is a devastating, often ugly, and ultimately hopeful expression of love, faith, family, and acceptance. Highly recommended!