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Recommendations

Recommendations

  • Rachel Feeny-Williams:
    14 Jul. 2021
    I've never known a great deal about the Brontë sisters but this piece opened my eyes a new, which is always a great thing for theatre. Taking this interesting new perspective and drawing the audience in so that you can't help but want to know more. By the end I found myself wanting to research more about the sisters! A very well done piece.
  • Christine Foster:
    22 Apr. 2021
    'All feelings are good. Including sadness'. Or so Charlotte tells the little daughter of her mentor in Brussels, a man she has come to love but can never have. O'Grady's is an elegant, insightful play about the inner life of the author of Jane Eyre and how she came to cope with her loneliness, her lack of life experience and her blighted opportunities with dignity and selflessness. The characters are warmly and delightfully drawn and the whole play is richly, if sadly, satisfying.
  • Lee R. Lawing:
    5 Apr. 2021
    Letters are so initiate and bring about such different emotions while holding them in hand. This is no different then O'Grady's play Charlotte's Letters. I love O'Grady's taking off some of the mystery to Charlotte Bronte as we sit and watch Elizabeth Gaskell's and her daughter piece together the life of someone so shy, but who like so many of us lived out life fully, and if not as she wanted entirely, because who knows what would happen to Charlotte in today's world, but who lived her life with such an eye on the world around her.
  • Catherine Rush:
    14 Mar. 2021
    Jennifer O'Grady deftly walks the line between biography and storytelling. The play is compelling, fascinating and beautifully written. No wonder it has garnered so many awards and accolades. I look forward to seeing it someday.
  • Chelsea Frandsen:
    26 Feb. 2021
    OH MY WOW!!!!(insert heart eyes here). Charlotte Bronte and her time in Belgium has always fascinated me, as well as Elizabeth Gaskell's fabulous biography of same. Jennifer O'Grady has crafted a beautiful love letter(no pun intended) to these two great women--one a writer, the other her biographer--and asks a question we should all be asking: is the "bald truth" always a good thing? I fell fast and hard for Heger just as Charlotte did and my heart broke for both of them. Stunning, meaty roles for women make this play an absolute winner!
  • Jacquelyn Floyd-Priskorn:
    26 Feb. 2021
    I, like many others, have a great love for the novel JANE EYRE. This play feels almost like a prequel. It shows us a love that is earned between Charlotte and Heger. And because it is earned it is that much more painful to watch it be torn away. I didn't expect to cry reading this, but here I am telling my own tears to "go away." But it seems this is a story that truly deserves them.
    Just lovely.
  • Claudia Haas:
    30 Jan. 2020
    A gorgeous layered play about love, duty, and memory. I was hooked from the lyrical opening through the end. What does a biographer owe her subject? Absolute truth (warts & all) or a truth ensconced in the mores of the times? I loved the mixture of “duties” required by Charlotte to family, work, and her calling combined with Gaskell’s duty as biographer and protector-of-reputation. There is irony that while Gaskell cleansed Chatlotte’s reputation, she also preserved it. O’Grady seamlessly puts together a story of complicated women navigating a time that was not kind to them.
  • Bryan Stubbles:
    21 Dec. 2019
    If you're really into the Brontë sisters, you're gonna love this play.
  • Doug DeVita:
    22 Nov. 2019
    Oh, how I love this play. As a fan of 19th century British literature, and the Brontës in particular, reading this was a treat. Elegantly written and beautifully spare, O'Grady captures both Charlotte Brontë's spirit and character, and puts forth her supposition regarding the genesis of "Jane Eyre" with remarkable clarity and a sure sense of the dramatic, licenses notwithstanding. A superb, magical, wonderful work.
  • D.W. Gregory:
    23 Aug. 2019
    You don't have to be a fan of gothic fiction to be enthralled by this fascinating glimpse into the private life of Charlotte Bronte, author of Jane Eyre. O'Grady offers a theory about an emotional affair that might have inspired the novel, but tells it through the eyes of Charlotte Bronte's friend and biographer, Mrs. Gaskell, whose desire to protect the author's reputation conflicts with her own need to ferret out the truth. O'Grady handles the material deftly, with both humor and lyricism, yet the tension never flags. Quite an achievement.

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