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Recommendations

Recommendations

  • Ryan Morales:
    2 Sep. 2021
    TEACH is a fantastic play that is enhanced by the flexibility with which the casting of the roles adds depth and nuance to the power dynamics at play. Each production of TEACH is innately unique in that way. A director and a producer can tell a lot of unspoken stories through these relationships, which, alongside the quick witted and biting dialogue, creates an impactful and thought-provoking night at the theatre.
  • Paul Hufker:
    6 Jan. 2021
    TEACH is remarkable -- I found it to be a fluid, timley, relevant interrogation play which connects the separate dichotomies of male vs female power dynamic interactions, as well as explores necessary and uncomfortable educational boundaries. As a professor, I found it riveting.

    I also deeply admire the way Ms. Hoke made a properly connected, time-fluid story with only a few chairs as a set; that’s craft at its highest.
  • Rachel Luann Strayer:
    14 Nov. 2020
    The style of Donna Hoke's TEACH highlights the complexities of relationships that sit right on that borderline between "ok" and "not ok" - and drives home the realization that when you're that close to the line, you've probably already crossed it. The staging in incredibly interesting and sends a strong pointed message about the way power can be abused, regardless of gender or sexual orientation.
  • Cait Kelly:
    8 Jun. 2020
    This piece is very special. Not only is the story incredibly engaging, but the diversity of gender, sex, and race create an opportunity for the audience to view the same situation from multiple viewpoints. This really challenges our personal biases and incites important conversation. Hoke writes each character with great nuance and sympathy, which adds to the complexity of the audience's experience. Highly recommend!
  • Nick Malakhow:
    20 Apr. 2020
    I was thoroughly engrossed in this intricately written piece! I loved how not only was the scenario itself was rich enough fodder for a compelling story, but Hoke also pushes the audience to constantly question and reframe how they'd feel about the situation given a rotating smorgasbord of gendered interactions. I also appreciated how the dialogue's flexibility and gender neutrality was so nuanced. The code-switching individual actors would have the opportunity to do while relating to various scene-partner-permutations would be a delightful challenge and also an excellent opportunity for bold conversation starting about gender, power, relationships, and propriety.
  • Keyanna Alexander:
    19 Apr. 2020
    Great show to have your audience question gender biases.
  • Rowen Haigh:
    19 Apr. 2020
    I keep trying to organize my feelings about TEACH and I love that I can't. It's poignant and tender...and creepy and awkward. Hoke brings us into each character's mind and spinning moral compass without losing a narrative beat. This is a play of layers and ripples—an untangling of threads that tangle themselves again behind your back. Everyone is culpable AND innocent. We, the audience, may think we see the clear ethical line that the teachers and students alike cross, but Hoke writes each character with such honest compassion that we can also understand how they succumb to temptation.
  • Julie Zaffarano:
    17 Apr. 2020
    TEACH is a riveting and intense story that transcends the reader into the world of these characters. We feel their longing for for that unconditional touch. Brilliantly crafted, poetic, and haunting.
  • Andrew Rosendorf:
    3 Feb. 2020
    An uncovering of the past and present that you think is going one direction but then veers to an unforeseen path where we start to question our own biases, our own views on power, on gender, and on love. A unique investigation and exploration on those that teach us in our lives, those that we teach, and the mistakes (sometimes catastrophic, sometime stumbles) that make us all flawed and human.
  • sheila duane:
    6 Jan. 2020
    This is an incredibly compelling, interesting play that asks a lot of questions. Some people look to theater for answers... this play offers few answers but highlights questions about desire and ethics in high school classrooms. It also visits the issue of power structures in the workplace and sexual attraction. After reading it the first time, I was angry at Ken for his manipulation and his abuse of his the power of his office; but after reading it the second time, I began to believe that the characters' shifting gender identities tell another story.

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