Artistic Statement

Artistic Statement

I am committed, now more than ever, to giving voice to female protagonists. And I make no apologies for writing complicated, big, sometimes messy, and often times funny plays about women. My plays are about the power of the mother, the power of the child, and the power of sex. I write about fate, myths and war, both the external physical war and the internal war that women fight every day. I also write about the universal matters of love, death and family. But I try to turn these inside out and upside down to expose questionable undercurrents of a character and then push that character toward the blinding white light of forgiveness. I write about how all of these themes constrain women, and conversely, how they can break women free.

Just as important, I write about complicated women and big themes because more plays about women exploring these big themes need to be experienced on the stage. My hope is to crack apart some skulls and open some hearts with my female narratives.

One of my big projects I am currently working on is a four play cycle where I am RECLAIMING Greek Classics and Myths and re-envisioning the female narratives from the female perspective. More specifically, I am setting these four reclaimed stories during the last half of the 20th century and first two decades of the 21st. The first play starts in 1960, titled BLISS (or Emily Post is Dead!), where I reclaim the narratives of Clytemnestra, Medea, Antigone and Cassandra. The remaining plays are: O: A Rhapsody in Divorce, where I reclaim the Odysseus myth and tell it as a woman going through a divorce as she goes on an epic couch-hopping journey (yup, I wrote that play); Medusa’s Song, which is about rape culture on college campuses; and Visiting Hours about the myth of Persephone mainly set in a psychiatric care facility.