Larissa Marten

Larissa Marten

Larissa Marten is fluent in both German and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air theme song. Actually. Despite her German roots, Larissa now lives in New York. As an actor she has worked on screen with Instinct (CBS). NY/Regional theatre credits include Kill Hamlet (Signature Theatre); Boeing-Boeing (Majestic Theater); Henry VI Parts 1, 2, 3 (Queens Shakespeare); As You Like It & Richard II (Michigan Shakespeare...
Larissa Marten is fluent in both German and The Fresh Prince of Bel-Air theme song. Actually. Despite her German roots, Larissa now lives in New York. As an actor she has worked on screen with Instinct (CBS). NY/Regional theatre credits include Kill Hamlet (Signature Theatre); Boeing-Boeing (Majestic Theater); Henry VI Parts 1, 2, 3 (Queens Shakespeare); As You Like It & Richard II (Michigan Shakespeare Festival - BroadwayWorld Best Actor). Her plays have been developed and/or presented at the Kennedy Center, City Theatre, the Hudson Guild Theatre, and the Beckwith Theatre Company. She has been published by Solos Literary Magazine and the Texas Theatre Journal. Larissa is the co-director of the theatre collective, Herd, for which she currently tours nationally with I Killed the Cow, a one-woman show using humor to discuss sexual assault (ikilledthecow.com). BFA Acting, University of Michigan. Proud member of AEA and the Dramatists Guild. larissamarten.com @larissamarten

Plays

  • I Killed the Cow
    When it feels like you’re being devoured alive, how do you make your body your own? One woman charts the lawless pastures of sexuality in the show Twin Cities Arts Reader calls a “Must See”. “Heartfelt & thought-provoking” - One Girl-Two Cities. “This show reminds us how good solo performance can be.”
  • Superboy
    Death isn’t scary. Or, at least that’s what Daisy thinks. We follow Daisy, a teenage dreamer who longs for Americana, after her father got shot. Smothered by the people who feel the need to protect her, Daisy builds an affinity for superheroes, and grapples to decipher who the bad guys truly are. Adults prove to have less influence than cartoons in this coming of age story.
  • I Killed the Cow - TOUR
    The tour version of I KILLED THE COW. I KILLED THE COW is a one-woman show that inspires discourse and reflection, furthering understanding in the realm of assault, ultimately changing organizational culture. Through the use of humor and physical storytelling we help open up the conversation about sex in a way that is more digestible. We stimulate organizations to recognize their community, and move beyond...
    The tour version of I KILLED THE COW. I KILLED THE COW is a one-woman show that inspires discourse and reflection, furthering understanding in the realm of assault, ultimately changing organizational culture. Through the use of humor and physical storytelling we help open up the conversation about sex in a way that is more digestible. We stimulate organizations to recognize their community, and move beyond beliefs rooted in traditional power structures. This increases engagement and allows for more inclusivity, leading to higher profit margins and a more advantageous learning environment.
  • Country for Capitalists
    We open on two actresses rehearsing their performance art piece about Warren Buffett and Charlie Munger. Their farce turns upside down when their Bernie Sanders impersonator doesn’t show up, and they find out who voted for whom in the 2016 election.
  • Lost. Shared. Taken.
    We bite the bullet and we feed our souls and we lose our virginities. Sometimes the verbs we use don’t make the most sense. The moment we exit virginity and enter whatever comes next, isn’t always a moment of loss. It can also be a moment of sharing, or of taking. Lost. Shared. Taken. is a solo theatre piece, that allows the audience to decide the verb they want to use when discussing their virginity.
  • The Ladder
    I don't see color. Or so they say. The Ladder follows two women in a world where color has never been taught. Privilege has to be learned through virtual realities, where participants are given scenarios that change due to their race. In the end, we may not be as different as we think.
  • Cleaner on the Other Side
    Jade wanted to be president. Tanya wants to stay drunk. It's the night of the election and Tanya's step-dad is in the race. But Jade and Tanya are running their own race in the other direction. Because believing in yourself isn't always easy. Especially when you're running against yourself.
  • Michelle Eats a Taco
    Michelle has run away in search of something more. Little does she know that what she was looking for could be found in a Taco Bell in the middle of nowhere. The 1% and the 99% collide in this play about the loneliness at the top, and the boredom at the bottom.
  • Jelly and Ice Cream
    Jelly and ice cream when Thatcher dies.
    Jelly and ice cream when Thatcher dies.
    We’re having a party when Thatcher dies.
    Jelly and ice cream when Thatcher dies.
    Inspired by this song, sung at Scottish soccer games when the Rangers play Celtic, Jelly and Ice Cream dissects the role of nature versus nurture in learned violence. If your father were to teach you this song at a young age...
    Jelly and ice cream when Thatcher dies.
    Jelly and ice cream when Thatcher dies.
    We’re having a party when Thatcher dies.
    Jelly and ice cream when Thatcher dies.
    Inspired by this song, sung at Scottish soccer games when the Rangers play Celtic, Jelly and Ice Cream dissects the role of nature versus nurture in learned violence. If your father were to teach you this song at a young age, would you even have a chance?
  • My Mom Lives in the Attic
    Nina, the quintessential nasty woman, comes home to find Brody, the quintessential lazy woman, breaking into her house. My Mom Lives in the Attic begs the question of what extent one will go to for those we love. If Brody's mom were sick, would that justify her actions?
  • Rockets
    Rockets follows the life of Em, as we discover the moments that shaped her. A non-linear story evolves, as the other actors play nondescript characters, leaving the audience to interpret who these people represent for Em.