Caroline Turner Cole

Caroline Turner Cole

Caroline Turner Cole is a theatre maker from Dallas, TX. She writes, acts, and advocates for theatre in schools by teaching after school programs and directing youth theatre. Recently, her short play "Steps" was commissioned by Spark and Echo Arts, her first full-length play, "Our Space" was one of three finalists in Pegasus Theatre's Fresh Reads 2 Festival, and her play "Honestly...
Caroline Turner Cole is a theatre maker from Dallas, TX. She writes, acts, and advocates for theatre in schools by teaching after school programs and directing youth theatre. Recently, her short play "Steps" was commissioned by Spark and Echo Arts, her first full-length play, "Our Space" was one of three finalists in Pegasus Theatre's Fresh Reads 2 Festival, and her play "Honestly" came in 2nd place at Bishop Arts Theatre's PlayPride LGBT Festival. Her current obsession is putting the Internet onstage and exploring connection. With so much of our lives now online, she's fascinated with translating this 'online life' into a theatrical setting, deconstructing and reconstructing how we see ourselves and interact with each other.

Plays

  • Honestly
    Honestly is inspired by the more or less true story of Georgia Bardman. It examines issues of trust, friendship and love through the foggy lens of the Internet. Georgia, suffering from HIV, reaches out for support by starting a blog. Due to the anonymity offered by this medium, Georgia opens up quickly about the heart-wrenching story of her past. Soon, an eager, supportive community invests much of their time...
    Honestly is inspired by the more or less true story of Georgia Bardman. It examines issues of trust, friendship and love through the foggy lens of the Internet. Georgia, suffering from HIV, reaches out for support by starting a blog. Due to the anonymity offered by this medium, Georgia opens up quickly about the heart-wrenching story of her past. Soon, an eager, supportive community invests much of their time and energy in her journey. This piece confronts the fatal issue of forming friendships online – how can we connect deeply in an environment where there is no accountability? How can you protect yourself from becoming taken advantage of emotionally without becoming paranoid and distrusting of everyone who crosses your path? This play recently premiered in Dallas, TX at the PlayPride LGBT Festival and won second place.
  • Herstorical Pen Pals
    Herstorical Pen Pals jumps between the 19th century and 21st century as two pre-teen girls strike up an unlikely correspondence about what it means to be a young woman in the United States. Both caught between childhood and adulthood, the girls struggle with being ignored, taken seriously, or listened to by the older generation. Harriet Hanson (later Robinson) works at a cotton mill in Massachusetts where she...
    Herstorical Pen Pals jumps between the 19th century and 21st century as two pre-teen girls strike up an unlikely correspondence about what it means to be a young woman in the United States. Both caught between childhood and adulthood, the girls struggle with being ignored, taken seriously, or listened to by the older generation. Harriet Hanson (later Robinson) works at a cotton mill in Massachusetts where she helps lead a strike based on unfair pay despite the fact that she is only ten years old. Her actions and friendship with Heather Rachel Corning inspire her to take action and change things at her own school. This play was written as part of the Women 365 Playwriting project which creates theatre inspired by historical women.
  • Our Space
    "Our Space" explores the use of social media by bringing to the stage some unlikely characters -- Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and others lead the audience through the digital world, exploring daily life on the internet through a theatrical lens. A surreal and yet surprisingly realistic look at how constant “connection” can work in reverse to break down relationships. A demanding and exciting ensemble...
    "Our Space" explores the use of social media by bringing to the stage some unlikely characters -- Facebook, Instagram, Twitter and others lead the audience through the digital world, exploring daily life on the internet through a theatrical lens. A surreal and yet surprisingly realistic look at how constant “connection” can work in reverse to break down relationships. A demanding and exciting ensemble piece accessible and appropriate for ages 12 and up. Cast size between 13 and 20; gender largely irrelevant in casting.