Ryan Diller

Ryan Diller

Ryan Diller was born and raised in Texas and completed their MFA in Playwriting at the University of Calgary. Their thesis play -- Urning -- is about Karl Heinrich Ulrichs, a key but mostly forgotten progenitor of the modern queer rights movement. Their plays have received staged readings at Trinity University in San Antonio, TX, the University of Calgary in Calgary, AB, and Theatre Outré in Lethbridge, AB. An...
Ryan Diller was born and raised in Texas and completed their MFA in Playwriting at the University of Calgary. Their thesis play -- Urning -- is about Karl Heinrich Ulrichs, a key but mostly forgotten progenitor of the modern queer rights movement. Their plays have received staged readings at Trinity University in San Antonio, TX, the University of Calgary in Calgary, AB, and Theatre Outré in Lethbridge, AB. An audio recording of their play Gone is available on Bandcamp (https://ryandiller.bandcamp.com/releases). Their blogs include Ryan Diller on Stuff (https://ryandilleronstuff.wordpress.com) and Penny Madonna, the latter of which includes reviews of every Beatles song (https://pennymadonna.wordpress.com). Their topics of interest include mental health, religion, trans/non-binary identities, and parent-child relationships.

Plays

  • Urning
    In 1867 Munich, Karl Ulrichs becomes the first person to come out publicly in modern history. In an effort to secure validation for queer people, he forms a correspondence with Richard von Krafft-Ebing, an Austrian psychologist writing a book profiling what he deems sexual pathologies. Their story intersects with that of Lina, the child of Jewish immigrants in Vienna. Through Lina's grappling with their...
    In 1867 Munich, Karl Ulrichs becomes the first person to come out publicly in modern history. In an effort to secure validation for queer people, he forms a correspondence with Richard von Krafft-Ebing, an Austrian psychologist writing a book profiling what he deems sexual pathologies. Their story intersects with that of Lina, the child of Jewish immigrants in Vienna. Through Lina's grappling with their queer identity and Karl's assertion of the legitimacy of such identities, the modern queer movement is born.
  • Liberal Arts Ohio
    At Schminity University, a group of queer students face down infatuation, isolation, and wet dreams. There will be discussions of privilege, depression, and strange visits from guardian angels.
  • Mild Rude Humor
    Jac(k)’s genderfluid and game for whatever; Destiny’s a loose cannon doing her best; Audrey’s an actress without a show and a lesbian. At a liberal arts college in Ohio, these three queer kids combat loneliness with sex and Catholicism. Things are going to get weird.

    Functions as a stand-alone piece but also serves as a prequel to Liberal Arts Ohio
  • The Master at Rest
    1612, Stratford-upon-Avon: Will Shakespeare has retired from the bustle of his beloved London to the pastoral town of his youth. Now in his twilight years, he faces one last project: a collaboration with the wide-eyed John Fletcher. While Will attempts to solidify his legacy and pass the torch to The Globe’s new head writer, flashbacks to 1598 detail his rise to prominence. These scenes find the middle-aged...
    1612, Stratford-upon-Avon: Will Shakespeare has retired from the bustle of his beloved London to the pastoral town of his youth. Now in his twilight years, he faces one last project: a collaboration with the wide-eyed John Fletcher. While Will attempts to solidify his legacy and pass the torch to The Globe’s new head writer, flashbacks to 1598 detail his rise to prominence. These scenes find the middle-aged playwright planning the opening of The Globe, a playing space he hopes will define his career. This endeavor, however, prompts him to sever ties with Will Kemp, the jovial but insubordinate actor who made him famous. This betrayal -– and the trauma of his son’s death -– threatens his psychological well-being. In both 1598 and 1612, in London and Stratford alike, Shakespeare must contend with the constant specter of regret and the unpredictability of artistic inspiration. In the process, he will alter the fates of all around him.
  • The Fourth Commandment
    A quiet parish in Dallas, Texas is shaken up by the arrival of Father Phil Khoury, an outspoken Jesuit priest. His playful demeanor clashes with the neurotic James O’Shea, a second-generation Irish-American who’s a deacon in all but ordination. The two clash on just about everything Church-related: music, youth group activities, altar server necklaces, and even starting mass on time. But Father Khoury’s sermons...
    A quiet parish in Dallas, Texas is shaken up by the arrival of Father Phil Khoury, an outspoken Jesuit priest. His playful demeanor clashes with the neurotic James O’Shea, a second-generation Irish-American who’s a deacon in all but ordination. The two clash on just about everything Church-related: music, youth group activities, altar server necklaces, and even starting mass on time. But Father Khoury’s sermons on family strike a chord with O’Shea, and after a death in the parish, James’s past begins to haunt him again. As a result, Khoury and James are forced to confront their demons, and with them divorce, parental estrangement, homosexuality, and abortion through the lens of the contemporary Catholic Church.
  • Gone
    It's been one year since Dillon Parker died by suicide, and things are far from settled. Over the course of three days, three college students and three parents attempt to find some sort of redemption, teetering on the edge of sanity in the process.

    An audio recording of the play can be found on Bandcamp: https://ryandiller.bandcamp.com/releases
  • The Sin of Hippolytus
    Contemporary dialogues surrounding consent, religious-based abstinence, and gender identity inform this retelling of Euripides' tragedy.
  • The Cheerios Play
    A cereal-based phobia puts a couple's relationship to the test in this ten-minute comedy.
  • The Death of John the Baptist
    John the Baptist faces down absurdity when he learns of his order of execution from the childishly inept but powerful Herod Antipas.