Ezra Brain

Ezra Brain

Ezra Brain is a genderqueer writer, theatre maker, and teacher based in NYC. Their writing has been performed at the Tank, Literacy Theatre, Stop Pretending Theatre Project, Passaic Preparatory Academy, the New Masculinities Festival, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and Dixon Place. Ezra's plays have received readings at Florida Studio Theatre, the Studio Theatre at Tierra Del Sol, and the...
Ezra Brain is a genderqueer writer, theatre maker, and teacher based in NYC. Their writing has been performed at the Tank, Literacy Theatre, Stop Pretending Theatre Project, Passaic Preparatory Academy, the New Masculinities Festival, the University of North Carolina at Greensboro, and Dixon Place. Ezra's plays have received readings at Florida Studio Theatre, the Studio Theatre at Tierra Del Sol, and the Art Garage. Their play Something’s Coming (co-written with J. Andrew Norris) was a 2020 Finalist for the Jewish Playwriting Contest from the Jewish Plays Project. Ezra’s essays and articles have been published by Left Voice, Truthout, Musical Theatre Today, and Howlround. They are an award-winning teaching artist, a proud member of Ring of Keys and the Dramatists Guild, and a company member of This Is Not A Theatre Company and Embodied Theatre Project.
www.ezrabrain.com

Plays

  • She's Gone
    She’s Gone follows Sam, a genderqueer person in their 20s and 30s, as they end various relationships throughout the play. Each scene features the ending of a new relationship with new woman--all played by the same actress. Sometimes they end with a bang and sometimes with a whimper. In-between each scene, we see a fragment that exists out of time. These fragments give us insight into Sam’s past. Slowly, we...
    She’s Gone follows Sam, a genderqueer person in their 20s and 30s, as they end various relationships throughout the play. Each scene features the ending of a new relationship with new woman--all played by the same actress. Sometimes they end with a bang and sometimes with a whimper. In-between each scene, we see a fragment that exists out of time. These fragments give us insight into Sam’s past. Slowly, we begin to understand why they continually self-sabotage and we begin to grapple with the nature of love, loss, and relationships.

  • Something's Coming
    Co-Written with J. Andrew Norris.

    In 1957, West Side Story premiered on Broadway and changed the face of the modern American musical. Its creators are lauded as titans in the modern theater, collectively winning 37 Tony Awards over the past 60 years. It was through fire, brimstone, vitriol and Jerome Robbins perceived insanity that this piece was born, and remains an institution to this day. In...
    Co-Written with J. Andrew Norris.

    In 1957, West Side Story premiered on Broadway and changed the face of the modern American musical. Its creators are lauded as titans in the modern theater, collectively winning 37 Tony Awards over the past 60 years. It was through fire, brimstone, vitriol and Jerome Robbins perceived insanity that this piece was born, and remains an institution to this day. In Something's Coming, we meet our heroes at the beginning of the writing process, and follow them through the highs, lows, burnt cigarettes and double shots of whiskey that created the greatest American musical.
  • Service Industry
    (Co-written with J. Andrew Norris)

    How do you know when to quit? "Service Industry" follows Lily, an aspiring stand up comedian, as she starts a new job at a sports bar in NYC. She must balance her personal, artistic, and professional life as she navigates the endlessly complicated world of the service industry and ponders what to make of her career.
  • Antigone
    In a new adaptation, Sophocles' classic is refocused in on the relationship between Antigone and her sister; asking the question of how one lives in a world that is unfair and unforgiving.
  • Arden
    A radical re-appropriation of Shakespeare's "As You Like It", "Arden" follows Rosalind as they discover their gender fluidity, come to terms with the world around them, and accept that we are not all alone unhappy.
  • Run. Hide. Fight.
    Co-written with J. Andrew Norris

    Run. Hide. Fight. explores what happens at the site of a school shooting after the cameras leave. Utilizing a found structure based around the Department of Homeland Security's active shooter protocols, this play for teenagers is striving to engage with an often-talked about political issue from a new perspective.
  • Hysterical Naked
    Hysterical Naked" explores themes of mental illness and drug addiction through following two characters--A and B--who are using drugs to escape the world around them and their own minds. This piece uses modern dance, stage violence, and theatrical styles drawn from Sarah Kane and Antonin Artaud. "Hysterical Naked" contains text that is new as well as some lines that are drawn from Alan Ginsberg,...
    Hysterical Naked" explores themes of mental illness and drug addiction through following two characters--A and B--who are using drugs to escape the world around them and their own minds. This piece uses modern dance, stage violence, and theatrical styles drawn from Sarah Kane and Antonin Artaud. "Hysterical Naked" contains text that is new as well as some lines that are drawn from Alan Ginsberg, Karl Marx, Alfred Lord Tennyson, Sarah Kane, and William Shakespeare.
  • How To Be Happy
    How to Be Happy is a Zoom play and follows a distinguished professor of psychology whose award-winning class "How to Be Happy" has been moved online due to the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Illyria
    A re-imagining of Shakespeare's Twelfth Night, Illyria imagines how the plot would play out if it took place today. Issues of gender, sexuality, politics, and class are played out with reinterpretations of Shakespeare's' classic characters. Viola, our hero, must discover who she is and decide what she stands for while facing down Feste, a malevolent force dedicated to ensuring that the old order continues.
  • Rumblings of the Coming Storm
    "Rumblings of the Coming Storm' is a movement piece that examines the nature of oppression under capitalism and how to resist it. Freely adapted from the timeless writings of Lucy Parsons, this play pairs her words with dance and stage violence to tell an intimate and expansive story of how capitalism works and how the workers must resist it. This play combines the two movement vocabularies of dance...
    "Rumblings of the Coming Storm' is a movement piece that examines the nature of oppression under capitalism and how to resist it. Freely adapted from the timeless writings of Lucy Parsons, this play pairs her words with dance and stage violence to tell an intimate and expansive story of how capitalism works and how the workers must resist it. This play combines the two movement vocabularies of dance and stage violence to show the fundamental conflict between workers and bosses under capitalism. One performer (the worker) will be a dancer and the other (the boss) will be a fighter.
  • Silence or Violence
    A group of broken people live and hurt themselves in a London that exists outside of time
  • Be
    An experimental poetry and movement piece inspired by the words of Leo Tolstoy, "Be" documents two people who begin in sync and then, through the machinations of society, are forced apart and both go down their different, tragic, paths.
  • For Allison, with regret
    Two people exist in a theatrical space, perhaps they have always been there. Perhaps they haven't.
  • Boyfriends and Friends and Boys
    Two strangers meet on the bridge where they both planned to kill themselves.
  • Don't Get Lost
    Inspired by "Hansel and Gretel" this play explores the nature of trauma, the cycle of abuse, and victimization using the trappings of a fairy tale.
  • A Place You Go
    A non-linear exploration of the mind of a school shooter. "A Place You Go" tracks how trauma is passed from one person to another and is recreated across different situations.
  • All Palaces Are Temporary Places
    A malevolent force comes into the lives of three siblings and forces them to understand the darkness with which they exist.
  • Weak Beautiful People
    Inspired by Tennessee William's "Cat on a Hot Tin Roof," this play explores a one-night stand that doesn't go how either party wanted it to.
  • The Weight We Carry
    An estranged brother and sister reconnect after the young sister runs away from home and shows up at her brother's house.
  • Classical Violence
    Classical Violence explores the boxes that young boys are put into that leads them to violence later in life. Combining dance, stage violence, classical music, and theatre, Classical Violence outlines that tragedy of learned toxic masculinity."