David Earle

David Earle

Born and raised in Anaheim, California, David Earle currently resides in northern Nevada amid the majestic High Sierras where he writes prolifically, varying from comedies to dramas, from novels to screenplays and plays.  He lived fifteen years in the Los Angeles area where he worked at various entertainment industry companies; Taft/Barish Productions, New World Pictures, Rogers & Cowan, Hollywood Records,...
Born and raised in Anaheim, California, David Earle currently resides in northern Nevada amid the majestic High Sierras where he writes prolifically, varying from comedies to dramas, from novels to screenplays and plays.  He lived fifteen years in the Los Angeles area where he worked at various entertainment industry companies; Taft/Barish Productions, New World Pictures, Rogers & Cowan, Hollywood Records, and most recently and notably at Walt Disney and in Creative Development at Disney Imagineering.  He has had four plays produced in the U.S. – After The Wedding; A Road To Nowhere; They’re Having A Deadly Good Time; and Postnuptials.  Postnuptials, an adult farce, had its Australian premiere at the Parade Theatres in Sydney where it was chosen as the theatrical event for the 2013 Sydney LGBT Mardi Gras.  Both the Postnuptials stage play and its (unproduced) screenplay adaptation have been nominated or won several awards at film festivals internationally.  He adapted his one-act stage drama, A Road to Nowhere, into a screenplay short (unproduced) that has received several international film festival awards.  His fiction novel, Life Is But A Dream, is selling worldwide in 248 countries (notably on Amazon).  The (unproduced) screenplay adaptation of Life Is But A Dream, that he wrote, has won him numerous awards and nominations at a number of international film festivals and screenplay competitions.  His (unproduced) non-fictional Historical/Epic Docudrama screenplay, Pelée, has also won him awards internationally.  In addition, he has written the novelette, The Remarkable Travels of Billy Sparks, and short story, The Calla Lilies. David Earle is also a proud member of the Dramatists Guild of America and Writers Guild of America West.

Plays

  • A Road to Nowhere
    Finding he is lost and alone at night on an unfamiliar rural country road following an accident, Sam Kaufman seeks help at a roadside motel. However, the bleak and depressing ambiance of the place proves to be of little consequence compared to the bizarre behavior of the motel manager and his guests. Gradually, Sam comes to realize the macabre circumstances of where he is and that the road that led him to this...
    Finding he is lost and alone at night on an unfamiliar rural country road following an accident, Sam Kaufman seeks help at a roadside motel. However, the bleak and depressing ambiance of the place proves to be of little consequence compared to the bizarre behavior of the motel manager and his guests. Gradually, Sam comes to realize the macabre circumstances of where he is and that the road that led him to this motel was, in fact, a road to nowhere.
  • Postnuptials
    Postnuptials is a contemporary adult farce examining human behavior with a modern twist while it explores thematic concerns of gay marriage, heterosexual infidelity, the extent of unconditional love, and an individual's quest to challenge parental conditioning, laid down in childhood that at times may inhibit an adult's own choices in life, and perhaps the meeting of true minds and hearts in a search...
    Postnuptials is a contemporary adult farce examining human behavior with a modern twist while it explores thematic concerns of gay marriage, heterosexual infidelity, the extent of unconditional love, and an individual's quest to challenge parental conditioning, laid down in childhood that at times may inhibit an adult's own choices in life, and perhaps the meeting of true minds and hearts in a search for love.


    A ménage à trois of love, secrets and drag, set in present-day Fresno, California that begins shortly after newlyweds Kevin and Lillian cross that threshold of matrimony only to have their first night of wedded bliss degenerated into a nightmare of chaos and confusion when a female impersonator from the Las Vegas strip named Joey (a.k.a. Amber Star) arrives at their apartment with the intent of bringing closure with his husband who jilted him the morning after their impromptu wedding one year prior. When the news that “Kevin is a homosexual bigamist married to a drag queen” reaches the wedding party still at the reception; in-laws, a sibling maid of honor, a drunken best man, and a dim-witted ex-fiancé join the fray that culminates into a surprise ending where unpredictable pairings are formed while another crumbles, an epiphany over love versus steadfast principles is realized, and someone comes out of the closet.


    The themes focused upon in Postnuptials are the universality of the human need to be loved and respected no matter the gender, race, religion or sexual preference. In particular, the play explores notions of love in relation to conventional marriage and gay marriage, which reinforces love, trust, and respect.