Michael Chabler

Michael Chabler

Michael Chabler is the author of the science fiction spy-thriller screenplay I Saw the Number 9. In 2016, he finished a novel by the same name. He is currently working on a sequel to I Saw The Number 9, titled What The Martian Nautilus Saw.

In 2017, he finished the play called A Paris Traveler Before The Revolutions.

He is a founding member of the children's music group...
Michael Chabler is the author of the science fiction spy-thriller screenplay I Saw the Number 9. In 2016, he finished a novel by the same name. He is currently working on a sequel to I Saw The Number 9, titled What The Martian Nautilus Saw.

In 2017, he finished the play called A Paris Traveler Before The Revolutions.

He is a founding member of the children's music group Treehouse 10, which released the album Bug in a Puddle in 2009.

Michael Chabler sang and co-wrote the music on this album with four former members of the Hillside Singers, famous for the '70s smash hit, "I'd Like to Teach The World To Sing" based on the Coca-Cola theme.

In the fall of 2016, he played a participant remembering a weird dream about Hillary, in a group sharing their dreams of Barack Obama and Hillary Clinton, in Ruth Patir's short Sleepers.

Also in the fall of 2016, he finished filming in the role of Judge Jack Woodward in the movie The Tragic Circumstances of 1948, about the imposition of Apartheid in South Africa.

He has written for radio, WCBE (an NPR affiliate) and WBAI, in New York City. He has also written for small newspapers.

He is also a member of the Dramatists Guild, the National Writers Union and Mystery Writers of America.

Plays

  • Helpdesk, Monday Through Friday
    A manager interviews an applicant “from Hell.” Both parties are unhappy with the experience.
  • Mealtime
    A friendly conversation in a bunker cafeteria after a nuclear war.
  • A Paris Traveler Before The Revolutions
    Nico, a lonely, American, college student unhappy personally and with the cultural climate in the Reagan era, wanders from London to Paris, hoping to establish new roots and reinvent himself.

    In a dream, his great-grandfather, who emigrated from tsarist Russia, mocks and warns Nico, who is Jewish, that Europe still has divisions.

    By December 29th, 1988, after three weeks in Paris...
    Nico, a lonely, American, college student unhappy personally and with the cultural climate in the Reagan era, wanders from London to Paris, hoping to establish new roots and reinvent himself.

    In a dream, his great-grandfather, who emigrated from tsarist Russia, mocks and warns Nico, who is Jewish, that Europe still has divisions.

    By December 29th, 1988, after three weeks in Paris, Nico is running out of friends to help and money to survive, when a strung out stranger he meets in a charitably priced restaurant tells him about a budget hotel for students.

    The next morning he books his room there, in Paris’s Latin Quarter, where he meets the Algerian hotel owner, guests from West Germany, Australia, Sweden, South Africa, the U.K., Japan, other parts of the U.S. and French locals in the old Paris neighborhood. His new social interactions expose him to people who have faced similar, or more traumatic, life disappointments.

    After he visits Père Lachaise cemetery, two guests from Sweden host an informal end-of the-year party, then a séance, where they hear stories from Paris’s long past. Then the party guests share life disappointments and hopes for the future.

    On New Years’ Eve, Nico fails to get into any Paris night clubs, but joins an informal party with locals on the street. Just after midnight, he sees Emma, his hotel roommate from South Africa, who says she has to get her rest for an international independent film festival the next day, spurring Nico’s interest. She tells him he’s welcome to tag along the next day, so Nico goes back to the hotel with her.

    At the festival, Nico speaks with an agitated representative from the USSR and later at a dinner meets a French self-proclaimed Marxist and her boyfriend from Northern Ireland, who despises the English. Despite the capitalist system she believes will collapse, she admits liking things about America and Emma also helps ease tensions.

    When Nico and Emma come back to the hotel, Emma seduces him. In the morning Nico tells her he was a virgin and expresses some regret it wasn’t true love. Emma asks him to leave until Nico manages to calm her down and their discussion reveals a shared love of the arts and a passion for human rights, each of them critical of their respective countries.

    The final scene flashes forward to the present, and Nico is with his American wife and child as he chats online with Emma, who also has a family. Nico talks about the fears he had for America when he was in his twenties, when the U.S. had respect worldwide and how Europe changed suddenly in 1989. He and his wife express their regret for how the U.S. has fallen from its mantel.