Artistic Statement

Artistic Statement

I feel compelled to write stories that I have never seen on stage before. Growing up, theatre always seemed to be “white people sh*t.” It didn’t include me and as I got older it became “straight white people sh*t.” All of the plays we read in school, all the plays we were forced to go see were written by white straight men. If there were women of color, they were servants, whether literal or emotional servants. Two-dimensional characters whose only purpose was to be of service to the white characters. Queer characters were often cis men who served the same unfortunate purpose of women of color.

I decided I needed to change that.

In order to change the dramatic conversation I had been exposed to, I decided to write plays about complicated, complex women of color. My characters live in the duality of good and bad, simultaneously. These women are neither saints or villains; they’re eternally both. Each of them struggle to make the right choices because, more often than not, the wrong one is easier. These women are intelligent, blistered, and, most importantly, real. As these women navigate through the American landscape with a series of different issues, they all also struggle with the complicated idea of what it means to be a woman today and the layered complexity that adds to their various dilemmas.

I invite the audience into my world using humor and creating a recognizable world. We sit together, we drink together, and we live in these spaces together and my work reflects that. I write my plays to feel like a warm bubble bath that you can’t completely wash off. While you’re in the bath, you’re comfortable, you understand the circumstance but days later it still tingling on your skin. And hopefully, since you can’t quite wash the words off, you decide instead to be part of a proactive change to better the community around you.