Artistic Statement

Artistic Statement

I spent many a late night in high school Googling uber-specific search terms for a new movie, play, or story of any kind to devour—only to find that the story I wanted to devour did not exist, nor did any story with the elements I sought. That’s (maybe selfishly) what pushed me to choose a career in playwriting—a desire to end those two A.M. Google searches. But though I can say that this was a high school pastime, the truth is that they haven’t ended, and I think that’s why I continue to write.

I tell stories about sisters, about mothers and daughters, about young women who support each other in both necessary and unexpected ways. I tell stories about women in love, who are visibly affectionate onstage and whose relationships and plots are both about their love and how it is revolutionary, and about other subjects—their children or their careers or their families—because as vibrant and as subversive as love, especially queer love, still is, it shouldn’t be, and I think the only way to make it more normal is to build stories that show it as such. Plays where “lady love,” as a collaborator and friend of mine used to call it, is an accepted fact and it’s balancing a relationship with something like mental health struggles that’s the complicated part. I write to shape into existence the stories I wanted and still want so desperately to see—about coming out and about being out and about just being—and I hope that along the way, I’m creating stories that others find compelling, too. I write with love and with rage and most of all with passion—which is in my opinion, what you get when you insist that love and rage must coexist.