Alexandra Espinoza

Alexandra Espinoza

Alexandra Espinoza (she/her/Mx) is a playmaker, and her field is the theatre. Her worlds are full of everyday radicals who grapple with the magic that is required to dream a new world. She actively grounds her work in the voices of her communities: Black people and the African Diaspora, Latinx folx, and spaces of Queer expansion. An optimistic and curious polymath, she thought she would grow up to be a human...
Alexandra Espinoza (she/her/Mx) is a playmaker, and her field is the theatre. Her worlds are full of everyday radicals who grapple with the magic that is required to dream a new world. She actively grounds her work in the voices of her communities: Black people and the African Diaspora, Latinx folx, and spaces of Queer expansion. An optimistic and curious polymath, she thought she would grow up to be a human rights lawyer and is now a human rights artist.
As a playwright, she is a 2020 National Black Theatre “I Am Soul” Playwright Residency finalist. Her work blends adaptation with revolution, dreams with history, pain with power, laughter with rage. As a director, she led the Philadelphia premiere production of the 1915 anti-lynching propaganda play Rachel by Angelina Weld Grimké, a Black Queer Femme creative ancestor. As a performer, she seeks liberatory shapes for her body and voice, while queering narratives and offering witness to the Black Body in motion. Her work as an artist and activist is marked by precision, generosity, and a sharp dramaturgical eye that she employs for her own work and for those with whom she shares a path towards liberation.
Alexandra has a BA in History from Harvard; an MA in Global Media and Communication from The School of Oriental and African Studies, University of London; an MA in Theatre from Villanova University; and is a trained practitioner in Theatre of the Oppressed. She is a survivor of white supremacy culture, the daughter of immigrants, and lives a life of Black queer joy in Lenapehoking territory currently known as Philadelphia.

Plays

  • HOMERIDAE
    Mac, an adjunct lecturer, and Nessa, a freshman, have a lot in common. They’re slightly awkward, deeply passionate about Homer’s The Odyssey, and are African-Americans in a very white department at a very white school. They stumble upon the discovery that Homer himself came from Africa, and must figure out how best to honor this truth in the face of university administrators, overbearing older siblings, the...
    Mac, an adjunct lecturer, and Nessa, a freshman, have a lot in common. They’re slightly awkward, deeply passionate about Homer’s The Odyssey, and are African-Americans in a very white department at a very white school. They stumble upon the discovery that Homer himself came from Africa, and must figure out how best to honor this truth in the face of university administrators, overbearing older siblings, the Internet, and Homer himself. HOMERIDAE is a play about who controls the narrative, and about finding your voice when it seems like no one is listening.
  • All My Mothers Dream in Spanish (formerly Solly Dreams in Spanish)
    Inspired by Afro-Venezuelan folk history, All My Mothers Dream in Spanish is about three generations of an Afro-Latinx family and their encounters with their ancestor named Guiomar. An Afro-Venezuelan folk hero, Guiomar was queen of Buría, a kingdom established by Africans who rebelled against enslavement in 1552. Guiomar also had the capacity for magic and has passed this on to her descendants who are: A...
    Inspired by Afro-Venezuelan folk history, All My Mothers Dream in Spanish is about three generations of an Afro-Latinx family and their encounters with their ancestor named Guiomar. An Afro-Venezuelan folk hero, Guiomar was queen of Buría, a kingdom established by Africans who rebelled against enslavement in 1552. Guiomar also had the capacity for magic and has passed this on to her descendants who are: A Grandmother who worked as a housekeeper and now listens to the birds who visit her mango tree… A Mother who is a successful physician in the United States and never taught her daughter her mother tongue… A Daughter who dropped out of law school to join a revolution in the same forest where Guiomar reigned as queen. This play is made of midnight conversations, Spanglish, and dreams that leave visible scars.
  • exxx...stasis, exxx...hale...
    A Black/Queer/2020 response to Euripides' Bakkhai. Nadia and Cecily are trying to make their socially distanced relationship work, but trying to keep it sexy is a whole different grape on the vine. When they both join a Zoom-room nightclub hosted by DJ Dion, the two love birds are thrust beyond their mundane digital world into an intoxicating new dimension. A glimpse into our current cultural moment, exxx...
    A Black/Queer/2020 response to Euripides' Bakkhai. Nadia and Cecily are trying to make their socially distanced relationship work, but trying to keep it sexy is a whole different grape on the vine. When they both join a Zoom-room nightclub hosted by DJ Dion, the two love birds are thrust beyond their mundane digital world into an intoxicating new dimension. A glimpse into our current cultural moment, exxx...stasis, exxx...hale… serves up a politically radical, and radically queer, virtual fantasia. “So dance.”
  • A Lynching Play for Today (Working Title)
    A contemporary response to the lynching play tradition of the early 20th century
  • The Mango Tree (Featured in Power Street Theatre Company's PALANTE)
    A stream of consciousness on Latinidad, originally performed with drumbeats. A walk through a tropical forest. A call to action.