Alexandra Espinoza

Alexandra Espinoza

Alexandra Espinoza is a theatre artist whose work aims to connect creative power to community voices. She is a second-year member of the Foundry at PlayPenn and a member of New Pages, a writers’ group at Azuka Theatre. She is based in Philadelphia, where she has worked as an actor, dramaturg, director, and teaching artist. As a playwright, her short plays and performance pieces have been produced by Juniper...
Alexandra Espinoza is a theatre artist whose work aims to connect creative power to community voices. She is a second-year member of the Foundry at PlayPenn and a member of New Pages, a writers’ group at Azuka Theatre. She is based in Philadelphia, where she has worked as an actor, dramaturg, director, and teaching artist. As a playwright, her short plays and performance pieces have been produced by Juniper Productions and Power Street Theatre Company. Her full-length play Homeridae received a PlayPenn Education reading and was developed at the Great Plains Theatre Conference as well as the Seven Devils Playwrights Conference. Performance credits include Boycott Esther (Azuka Theatre, Barrymore nomination for Supporting Performance), Peaceable Kingdom (Orbiter 3, Barrymore nomination for Outstanding Ensemble), Now More Than Ever (Philly Fringe), and several staged readings. She has dramaturgy and directing credits at Simpatico Theatre, Azuka Theatre, the National Constitution Center, Inis Nua Theatre, and PlayPenn. She has served as a resident teaching artist at Philadelphia Young Playwrights and was awarded a Bartol Foundation micro-grant for her work as a Theatre of the Oppressed facilitator. Alexandra has a BA in History from Harvard University and an MA in Global Media and Communication from the School of Oriental and African Studies at the University of London. She also has an MA in Theatre from Villanova University where she was awarded the Barbara Wall Award for Feminist Praxis for her performance as research project on applying a Brechtian aesthetic to Lynn Nottage’s Intimate Apparel. She is an enthusiastic and curious polymath who thought she’d be a human rights lawyer, and instead has become a human rights playwright.

Plays

  • HOMERIDAE
    Mac, an adjunct lecturer, and Nessa, a freshman, have a lot in common. They’re slightly awkward, deeply passionate about Homer’s The Odyssey, and are both African-Americans in a very white department at a very white school. They stumble upon the discovery that Homer himself came from Africa and must figure out how best to honor this in the face of conservative administrators, overbearing older siblings, the...
    Mac, an adjunct lecturer, and Nessa, a freshman, have a lot in common. They’re slightly awkward, deeply passionate about Homer’s The Odyssey, and are both African-Americans in a very white department at a very white school. They stumble upon the discovery that Homer himself came from Africa and must figure out how best to honor this in the face of conservative administrators, overbearing older siblings, the Internet, and Homer himself. Homeridae is a play about stories, language, knowledge, and loss; and about finding your voice when it seems like no one is listening.
  • A Lynching Play for Today (Working Title)
    A contemporary response to the lynching play tradition of the early 20th century
  • The Mango Tree (Featured in Power Street Theatre Company's PALANTE)
    A stream of consciousness on Latinidad, originally performed with drumbeats. A walk through a tropical forest. A call to action.

Recommended by Alexandra Espinoza

  • Walden
    5 Jun. 2019
    This play is gentle and devastating at the same time. It expertly weaves together two problems that many of us try our damndest to ignore: climate change and sibling dynamics, forcing us not only to pay attention, but to make space for hope, love, and optimism in both scenarios. It is a play that helps us imagine what happens if we open our hearts to the people we've known our whole lives, and the people we may never know but share the same fate as us on our little planet. Produce it!
  • Good Cuban Girls
    21 Mar. 2019
    Good Cuban Girls is incredibly revelatory and relatable in its specificity. It is both laugh out loud funny and the kind of play that makes you want to call your Latina mother and thank her for loving you as hard as she does. The difficult choices that the characters face reveal their deep commitment to family, principle, faith, and culture. Iraisa Ann's writing is deeply humane and should be witnessed by anyone who has ever loved a grandmother, mother, daughter, or brought someone home to meet a grandmother, mother, or daughter (I think that's all of us!)