Peter Manos

Peter Manos

Peter Manos has been a director, playwright and actor in New York and regionally. He recently published a new play about the Underground Railroad, OH FREEDOM! THE STORY OF THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD which is available through Dramatic Publishing, along with his play about the Civil Rights Movement: WALK, DON'T RIDE: A CELEBRATION OF THE FIGHT FOR EQUALITY, which has been presented extensively around the...
Peter Manos has been a director, playwright and actor in New York and regionally. He recently published a new play about the Underground Railroad, OH FREEDOM! THE STORY OF THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD which is available through Dramatic Publishing, along with his play about the Civil Rights Movement: WALK, DON'T RIDE: A CELEBRATION OF THE FIGHT FOR EQUALITY, which has been presented extensively around the country by professional, amateur and school groups. Recently his comedy set in the Middle Ages, GOLDEN, was a finalist at Centre Stage's New Play Festival in Greenville, S.C. His dramatic interpretation of Anthony Hope's THE PRISONER OF ZENDA was presented at Paper Mill Playhouse in New Jersey, and his play COLONEL CHABERT about a Napoleonic cavalry officer, presumed dead, who comes back years later to reclaim his since-remarried wife, based on the short story by Honore de Balzac, was a runner-up at the L. Arnold Weissberger New Dramatist Competition and was presented at New York's Ensemble Studio Theatre and Manhattan Class Company. His play PASTORAL SYMPHONY, inspired by the Andre Gide novelette about a Swiss pastor's destructive love for a blind girl, was given a workshop production at the Lamb's Theatre Company in New York and was awarded a Pilgrim Excellence in the Arts grant. His Revolutionary War drama, SILKIE, was a finalist for the Beverly Hills Theatre Guild's Julie Harris Playwright Award. His one act comedy CHILD'S PLAY, about backstage shenanigans at a traveling children's theatre, premiered at Manhattan Punchline in New York. In Cleveland, Ohio, where he now calls home, his works have appeared at the Cleveland Public Theatre and Great Lakes Theater Festival. As an actor, Manos has performed in numerous productions off-Broadway and regionally. Favorite roles include Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Macbeth and Thomas Mendip in The Lady's Not for Burning by Christopher Fry. He was Calamassi in the U.S. premiere of Bertolt Brecht's Roundheads and Peakheads off-Broadway and won a Best Actor Award at the Quebec Drama Festival as The Stranger in To the Chicago Abyss, adapted from Ray Bradbury's short story. Most recently in Cleveland, Manos appeared as Sir Thomas More in Robert Bolt's A Man for All Seasons. He recently completed his Ph.D. studies in American history at University of Akron, specializing in the American Revolution, and teaches at John Carroll University, Cleveland State University and Cuyahoga Community College in both history and communication/theatre. Manos is artistic director of the Bodwin Theatre Company. He is blessed to be married to the actress Sandra Manos. They have three wonderful boys: Sean, Eli and Nicholas.

Plays

  • A TALE OF TWO SPECTATORS
    In a park, a man and a woman contemplate their lives and develop a bond with each other as they secretly watch their respective spouses carry on an affair.
  • Young Man Lincoln
    A play with music from the American Songbook for young audiences about the rollicking frontier childhood of America's greatest president, Abraham Lincoln, from his log cabin upbringing to his time as a rail splitter, riverboat captain, budding lawyer and his first encounter with slavery.
  • SILENT NIGHT
    A Christmas play with music about the improbable but (mostly) true story of how the most beloved Christmas Carol in the world was written and sung for the first time in a small church in Austria, during a snow storm, in 1818. It also involves a child with special needs, who may have brought it all about, showing how love and tolerance of those who are different can sometimes produce wonderful things.
  • P.H.I.L.
    With his marriage on the rocks, Rob gets back at his wife Sadie by ordering a robotic clone of himself, P.H.I.L. (Partnering Helpmate In Life), from Amazon. If she want the perfect man, she should have one. Sadie is at first thrilled, then increasingly horrified of her new robotic helpmate and out of revenge, orders a robotic clone of herself to send to Rob: P.H.I.L.L.I.S. (Partnering Helpmate In Life Lovely Is...
    With his marriage on the rocks, Rob gets back at his wife Sadie by ordering a robotic clone of himself, P.H.I.L. (Partnering Helpmate In Life), from Amazon. If she want the perfect man, she should have one. Sadie is at first thrilled, then increasingly horrified of her new robotic helpmate and out of revenge, orders a robotic clone of herself to send to Rob: P.H.I.L.L.I.S. (Partnering Helpmate In Life Lovely Is She) so he can experience the same thing. Part battle of the sexes in the digital age, part logical conclusion of Alexa and Siri as corporate America tries to give the consumer everything he or she wants, P.H.I.L. shows how our failure to understand each other and ourselves can turn our wildest dreams into our worst nightmares.
  • LOVING
    Based on the 1967 Supreme Court case that over-turned state laws banning inter-racial marriage, it tells the story of Richard Loving, who was white, and Mildred Jeter, who was African-American and Native American, who were prohibited by the state of Virginia from marrying. This one act play, ideal for traveling to schools, dramatizes their struggle and their ultimate court victory that changed American History.
  • The Pastoral Symphony
    Inspired by the novella of Nobel Prize for Literature author Andre Gide and winner of a Pilgrim Prize for Excellence, THE PASTORAL SYMPHONY tells the story of a Swiss pastor in the early 1900s who takes in a blind girl who also has not learned to speak and teaches her only to find himself falling in love with her, bringing tension to his family.
  • THE PRISONER OF ZENDA
    Based on the 19th Century Swashbuckler novel by Anthony Hope. A British adventurer traveling to the Central European kingdom of Ruritania is embroiled in political intrigue when he is found to be the exact double of the crown prince of that land. The play is designed so that the same actor can play both the adventurer and the prince (with a body double in some scenes).
  • THE BUTTERCUP AND THE BANSHEE
    Two pioneer families in southern Ohio in 1810 start a savage feud over water rights, which is finally resolved through seemingly magical forces.
  • EGON
    Two very creative but self-absorbed people, an artist and an actress, shack up together in a small New York apartment for the sake of convenience but soon find themselves drawn together in spite of their many idiosyncrasies. Eventually, they find love after accidentally having a baby together. In the process, they come to realize that life has deeper meaning than even the most successful acts of self-expression can produce.
  • COLONEL CHABERT
    Set in a law office in Paris, France in 1819. A cavalry officer in Napoleon's army, presumed dead for ten years, returns to reclaim his wife and estate. His wife has since remarried and has two children by her new husband, a foppish social climber who, on hearing of the soldier's return, and with an eye on marrying a richer woman, schemes to have the soldier reinstated as the woman's husband....
    Set in a law office in Paris, France in 1819. A cavalry officer in Napoleon's army, presumed dead for ten years, returns to reclaim his wife and estate. His wife has since remarried and has two children by her new husband, a foppish social climber who, on hearing of the soldier's return, and with an eye on marrying a richer woman, schemes to have the soldier reinstated as the woman's husband. The wife refuses to admit the returning soldier is her husband to protect her social position. Caught in the middle of this elegant comic drama is a well-meaning lawyer and his law clerks.
  • WALK, DON'T RIDE: A CELEBRATION OF THE FIGHT FOR EQUALITY
    Walk, Don't Ride! A Celebration of the Fight for Equality chronicles in words and song the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. It begins with the Montgomery bus boycott when, after the arrest of Rosa Parks for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a crowded bus, African-Americans and some whites stopped using the buses crying out "Walk, Don't Ride!" They walked, used car...
    Walk, Don't Ride! A Celebration of the Fight for Equality chronicles in words and song the civil rights movement of the 1950s and 1960s. It begins with the Montgomery bus boycott when, after the arrest of Rosa Parks for refusing to give up her seat to a white man on a crowded bus, African-Americans and some whites stopped using the buses crying out "Walk, Don't Ride!" They walked, used car pools and taxis, whatever it took to send the message that buses must not be segregated with blacks sitting in the back, whites in the front. Even in the face of harassment by police and racists, the boycott finally succeeded and led to the rise of a young Martin Luther King Jr. as leader of the movement. In Nashville, a group of college students of both races staged the Nashville lunch counter sit-ins at the downtown Nashville lunch counters, which refused to serve African-Americans. They sat—whites and blacks together—and peacefully ordered lunch and remained peaceful even as people poured hot coffee and food over them and the police came to arrest them. The play ends with the Greyhound/Trailways freedom rides in which activists of both races and all ages tried to peacefully integrate the bus lines that went through the south. These groups also met with violence and arrest but refused to fight back and remained peaceful even as they were being beaten up and led away to jail, where they were harassed further. In all of these movements, whites and blacks came together to peacefully protest segregation in America, often risking injury and death. It was American courage at its most courageous and a heroic time in America's past. Simple set. Approximate running time: 45 minutes.
  • OH FREEDOM! THE STORY OF THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD
    The greatest collaboration against racism in American History before the Civil Rights Movement was the Underground Railroad, in which persons of all ethnic backgrounds and of both sexes from North and South came together to resist the oppression of slavery by helping escaped slaves make their way to free territory in the years before the Civil War. OH FREEDOM! THE STORY OF THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD celebrates...
    The greatest collaboration against racism in American History before the Civil Rights Movement was the Underground Railroad, in which persons of all ethnic backgrounds and of both sexes from North and South came together to resist the oppression of slavery by helping escaped slaves make their way to free territory in the years before the Civil War. OH FREEDOM! THE STORY OF THE UNDERGROUND RAILROAD celebrates this collaboration combining the stories of the men and women who were active in the fight against slavery with songs of the period. Famous participants like Harriett Tubman and Harriet Beecher Stowe are here. So are lesser known heroes of the movement like John Rankin whose house on a hill above the Ohio River was a beacon for freedom for many escaping bondage, the mysterious “Peg Leg” Joe who moved among the plantations teaching slaves to escape and “Follow the Drinking Gourd,” a song designed to show them the way; and Henry “Box” Brown who had himself put in a box and mailed to freedom by general post! OH FREEDOM inspires us all to work together for the good of all as it celebrates a time when Americans were at their courageous best, supporting each other, regardless of background, ethnicity or gender, in the cause to extend to all Americans our greatest, most inalienable right: to be free. OH FREEDOM! can be performed with as few as four singing actors or can be expanded to include a large cast and choir. It is ideal for schools and for touring. There are no mandatory set requirements.
  • GOLDEN
    Golden, a comedy set in medieval Europe, involves a colorful bunch of characters including a nobleman, his servant, a rich widow, a scholar, a novice nun escaped from a convent, a Mother Superior and a mute. Misunderstandings run rampant as the mute is called into question for stealing a gold cup from the convent. Monty Python meets Shakespeare in this zany offering that asks the question, is silence Golden?