Mark Costello

Mark Costello

Mark J. Costello holds an MFA in playwriting from Temple University, and is a proud member of the Dramatists Guild. His plays have been recognized by the Children’s Theatre of New Jersey, Write Now, and the Great Plains Theatre Conference, and his dramaturgical and critical writings earned him a fellowship to the O’Neill Critics Institute in 2010. He has dramaturged and assistant dramaturged productions for...
Mark J. Costello holds an MFA in playwriting from Temple University, and is a proud member of the Dramatists Guild. His plays have been recognized by the Children’s Theatre of New Jersey, Write Now, and the Great Plains Theatre Conference, and his dramaturgical and critical writings earned him a fellowship to the O’Neill Critics Institute in 2010. He has dramaturged and assistant dramaturged productions for companies all over Philadelphia, including Philadelphia Theatre Company and the Arden, and he participates in new play development with playwrights at all levels of their career and training.

Plays

  • The Behavior of Other Animals
    It’s summer time in Corinth, Mississippi, 1985, and the first annual Slugburger Festival approaches. 15-year-old Lyra has recently lost her mother, and would rather keep her eye glued to the stars via an old telescope than socialize with the town. "Behavior" is about grief, and the beauty of listening.
  • Waiting for Rain
    Jenna and Ryan are built to love each other, and so they drink, and dance, and buy a Dalmatian named Buttons. Jenna’s wheelchair? Not a problem. Ryan’s drinking? Utterly charming.

    Until it isn’t. When old demons intrude in their new lives, Ryan and Jenna look to one another for answers, support, and ultimately, blame. Waiting for Rain is a piercing look into how easy it is to reject the love we deserve.
  • Kid Turboni Brings the Rain
    It’s 115 degrees in the shade in Kid Turboni’s Albuquerque housing project—the summer’s biggest heat wave yet, and there’s no end in sight. Tired of the heat’s foolishness, Kid and his best friend Billy set out to liberate their suffering people by stealing rain from Mother Nature just like their hero, fabled ex-tenant Smack Turkenson. But Kid has bigger problems than the heat. He misses his mom, his friend...
    It’s 115 degrees in the shade in Kid Turboni’s Albuquerque housing project—the summer’s biggest heat wave yet, and there’s no end in sight. Tired of the heat’s foolishness, Kid and his best friend Billy set out to liberate their suffering people by stealing rain from Mother Nature just like their hero, fabled ex-tenant Smack Turkenson. But Kid has bigger problems than the heat. He misses his mom, his friend Kelly wants to be more than friends, he can’t get his rain dance right, and everyone’s expectations for him are mighty hard to manage. It all crashes together as the temperature climbs, making everyone ask—can Kid Turboni bring the rain?
  • m4m
    Vienna runs on sex and power. When a judge and the city’s preeminent madame come into conflict, the city hangs in the balance and destruction is assured.

    A modernization and adaptation of Shakespeare's Measure for Measure that puts Lady Overdone at its center alongside Angelo, and the soul of Vienna in a precarious balance between them.
  • Maya
    An American missionary in India lies dying of cancer when her ex-lover finally tracks her down, intent upon bringing her home—with or without her consent. Brutal truths, worse lies, and buried secrets come out under the influence of sex, drugs, and Indian gods.
  • Truth or Consequences
    A married couple finds that the newly mainstream Internet creates profitable opportunities when it comes to selling their amateur adult films. When betrayal sets in, what happens in front of the camera bleeds into what’s behind, and their family suffers the wages of an ever-escalating series of retaliations.
  • Everyman
    God has ordered that Everyman must die, but not before he attempts to clear his accounts of earthly vice and sin. This modern translation brings new life to an old text and makes a historically significant piece of drama viable for new audiences.