Louis Venosta

Louis Venosta

Most recently, the director of Grey’s Anatomy, Season 13 — ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’, Louis Venosta’s directing debut, ‘The Coriolis Effect’ premiered at Sundance in 1994 before winning the Silver Lion at the Venice Film Festival. Last summer, 2016, he directed a workshop production of his own play, ‘Better’ as part of the Atlantic Theater Director’s Program. Mr. Venosta has written screenplays and teleplays for...
Most recently, the director of Grey’s Anatomy, Season 13 — ‘Don’t Stop Me Now’, Louis Venosta’s directing debut, ‘The Coriolis Effect’ premiered at Sundance in 1994 before winning the Silver Lion at the Venice Film Festival. Last summer, 2016, he directed a workshop production of his own play, ‘Better’ as part of the Atlantic Theater Director’s Program. Mr. Venosta has written screenplays and teleplays for all of the major Hollywood studios including “Bird on a Wire” starring Mel Gibson and Goldie Hawn, which he also co-produced, and “The Last Dragon” for Sony Pictures Entertainment and Motown Productions, as well as adapting stories by Isabel Allende and Alexander Pushkin for the screen. Mr. Venosta began his career in the theater and dance world, appearing with The Joffrey Ballet and Maurice Bejart's “Ballet de Deuxieme Siecle”, the Louis Falco Dance Company and others before making his first film appearance in the MGM film ‘Fame”. He made his television acting debut with a recurring role in the PBS Series, ‘Oye Willie’ about Nuyorican life in the heights.

Plays

  • Better -- (The Half-Life of Happiness)
    When newlywed urban A-types, Dennis and Malory arrive in paradise to kick off a perfectly imagined future together with the perfect honeymoon — going off their meds was never part of the plan. A meditation on love, marriage, identity, and the unintended consequences of modern psychopharmacology, BETTER sets out to explore the personal narratives we create in order to construct the WHO we present to those we...
    When newlywed urban A-types, Dennis and Malory arrive in paradise to kick off a perfectly imagined future together with the perfect honeymoon — going off their meds was never part of the plan. A meditation on love, marriage, identity, and the unintended consequences of modern psychopharmacology, BETTER sets out to explore the personal narratives we create in order to construct the WHO we present to those we love — and how the unexpected deconstruction of these narratives forces us to face perhaps the most terrifying thing imaginable — ourselves.