Ruben Carrazana

Ruben Carrazana

Ruben Carrazana is a Dallas-based theater artist. Regional acting credits include Dallas Theater Center, Undermain Theatre, Second Thought Theatre, the Danielle Georgiou Dance Group, The Tribe, Prism Co, and Cara MÍa Theatre Co. Regional directing credits include Cara Mía Theatre Co and Cry Havoc Theater. As a playwright Ruben was an invited member of the Dallas Playwrights' Workshop at the Dallas Theater...
Ruben Carrazana is a Dallas-based theater artist. Regional acting credits include Dallas Theater Center, Undermain Theatre, Second Thought Theatre, the Danielle Georgiou Dance Group, The Tribe, Prism Co, and Cara MÍa Theatre Co. Regional directing credits include Cara Mía Theatre Co and Cry Havoc Theater. As a playwright Ruben was an invited member of the Dallas Playwrights' Workshop at the Dallas Theater Center, and his original play "Stacy Has A Thing For Black Guys" was named Outstanding New Play/Musical by the Dallas-Fort Worth Theater Critics Forum. Ruben received his BFA in Theater from Southern Methodist University.

Plays

  • Stacy Has A Thing For Black Guys
    "Stacy Has A Thing For Black Guys" starts off like many contemporary living room comedies: three people sit in a living room, a white married couple and a black man, drinking lemonade, and making small talk while listening to Frank Sinatra playing softly in the background. However, as the night goes on, what started off as a seemingly safe and silly sex farce suddenly becomes slightly darker and more...
    "Stacy Has A Thing For Black Guys" starts off like many contemporary living room comedies: three people sit in a living room, a white married couple and a black man, drinking lemonade, and making small talk while listening to Frank Sinatra playing softly in the background. However, as the night goes on, what started off as a seemingly safe and silly sex farce suddenly becomes slightly darker and more violent as hidden prejudices bubble up to the surface. In most contemporary plays, the strings that make puppets of us all (whether we are conscious of it or not) remain invisible, but "Stacy Has A Thing For Black Guys" operates with a heightened sense of awareness of the historical and social context in which we now live, offering a sharp commentary on how we all choose to avoid honest conversations with others and ourselves about sex, gender, and race in America.