Audra Lord

Audra Lord

Audra Lord is a Seattle-based playwright with roots in Detroit theatre and a checkered past in acting. Her original work has been staged at theatres in the United States, Canada, Ireland, and New Zealand. As a writer, Audra is interested in exploring intersections between language, culture and identity; writing for devised and site-specific theatre; and using language in heightened, stylized, or innovative ways...
Audra Lord is a Seattle-based playwright with roots in Detroit theatre and a checkered past in acting. Her original work has been staged at theatres in the United States, Canada, Ireland, and New Zealand. As a writer, Audra is interested in exploring intersections between language, culture and identity; writing for devised and site-specific theatre; and using language in heightened, stylized, or innovative ways. Recently, Audra was honored with a Hedgebrook Writer’s Residency. She is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America.

Plays

  • Fugue
    How does memory shape identity? In a blank institutional space, James, Julie, Tina and Princess Stephanie recover from a shared tragic event that resulted in the complete loss of their memories. The play follows their attempts to remember, to forget, and to piece together their shared and individual identities.

    “Memory is a funny bird, isn’t it? There’s something in it that defies...
    How does memory shape identity? In a blank institutional space, James, Julie, Tina and Princess Stephanie recover from a shared tragic event that resulted in the complete loss of their memories. The play follows their attempts to remember, to forget, and to piece together their shared and individual identities.

    “Memory is a funny bird, isn’t it? There’s something in it that defies intellectual analysis. Like muscle memory, or God, either it’s there, or it isn’t, and you can grasp at it all you want, but the real test is about what comes when you’re not struggling for it. What happens when you just sit still? That’s what’s interesting to me.”
    (PRINCESS STEPHANIE, Fugue)
  • fall 낙하
    A parent's suicide is the backdrop for this exploration of identity, isolation and integration in a family of Korean immigrants.
  • This is not the end
    “I just hope you never forget. To look up.” At Brio Shelter and Resort, spacious lounges, fitness centers and sleek bars are engineered to withstand the worst that man or nature can dish out. But does this underground haven harbor victims, or survivors? Which side of the door would you rather be on?

Recommended by Audra Lord

  • The Terrible and the Sublime
    21 Sep. 2021
    Scott Stolnack deftly captures the sense of history, the almost geological layers of love and hurt and everything in-between, that exists between old friends-who-were-lovers. A poignant and relatable story.
  • h*llo k*tty syndrome
    21 Sep. 2021
    Dang’s script is an open-armed invitation to play, happily subverting Aristotelian conventions in a piece as spirited as it is moving in its parallel explorations of what constitutes a work of theatre and what constructs an identity. HK’s costume is an effective metaphor for the character’s own transformation, as well as (perhaps) a powerful wall for them to hide behind. At the same time, the character is not the costume, and the costume is not the character, as HK asserts the right to self-determine, using language to claim the identity they desire, not one assigned by others.
  • Gemini: Lessons in Self-Love
    21 Sep. 2021
    The play I wish I’d written when I was a single, twenty-something Gemini! Jacquelyn Floyd-Priskorn’s witty, fast-paced dialogue snaps, crackles, and makes me laugh out loud. Both of my personalities thoroughly enjoyed this highly satisfying read.