Alice Hakvaag

Alice Hakvaag

Alice Hakvaag (they/she) is a butch playwright originally from rural Pennsylvania, currently based in Philadelphia. They hold a BA in Theater from Temple University and is a proud Ring of Keys member. Her play As I Was, Not As I Am was nominated for a Susan Smith Blackburn Award, and was a semi-finalist for the Princess Grace Fellowship Award. Most recently, their play But Not Uncle Vanya premiered in...
Alice Hakvaag (they/she) is a butch playwright originally from rural Pennsylvania, currently based in Philadelphia. They hold a BA in Theater from Temple University and is a proud Ring of Keys member. Her play As I Was, Not As I Am was nominated for a Susan Smith Blackburn Award, and was a semi-finalist for the Princess Grace Fellowship Award. Most recently, their play But Not Uncle Vanya premiered in Philadelphia with Aporia Artist's Collective, of which they are a founding member. She has also worked internationally as a director, actor, and sound designer. When they aren't writing, they're probably doing something else in theater, and when they aren't doing that, they're probably playing Dungeons and Dragons.

alicehakvaag@gmail.com

Plays

  • As I Was, Not As I Am
    Laurel is sick. Her roommates want her to get better. How do you help someone who can't afford health care? Does it involve setting a car on fire? As I Was, Not As I Am is mainly about queer roommates, headaches, clubbing, upstairs neighbors, arson, and washing machines; but it's also about love: the kind that would make you do anything for each other.
  • Acute Exposure
    Dell has a mission, and Mara is along for the ride: to tell the people of the far-flung future that there is a dangerous store of nuclear waste hidden below the ground. But how do you craft a message so universal any culture could understand? How do two young queer people navigate finding themselves, and finding themselves after something has changed them? Are we even talking about waste anymore? Sparks fly-...
    Dell has a mission, and Mara is along for the ride: to tell the people of the far-flung future that there is a dangerous store of nuclear waste hidden below the ground. But how do you craft a message so universal any culture could understand? How do two young queer people navigate finding themselves, and finding themselves after something has changed them? Are we even talking about waste anymore? Sparks fly- and energy radiates- in this new play about a continuous problem.
  • Atrytone
    Athena came out of a headache, but now she has one of her own. How does the goddess of wisdom deal with pain? And why won't anyone believe (in) her?
  • But Not Uncle Vanya
    Uncle Vanya, without... Uncle Vanya. You know, the interesting parts of Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya, it’s just, those parts just happen to not have the character Uncle Vanya in them. Astrov is doing his best helming a rewrite of the play, with only Sonia and Yelena by his side. As Astrov tries to wrestle the story to his control and Sonia tries to keep her world together, Yelena starts to wonder if she could also...
    Uncle Vanya, without... Uncle Vanya. You know, the interesting parts of Chekhov’s Uncle Vanya, it’s just, those parts just happen to not have the character Uncle Vanya in them. Astrov is doing his best helming a rewrite of the play, with only Sonia and Yelena by his side. As Astrov tries to wrestle the story to his control and Sonia tries to keep her world together, Yelena starts to wonder if she could also make changes. Maybe even remove herself entirely.