Recommended by Mary Lyon Kamitaki

  • Monsters Are Made
    16 Jan. 2020
    This play is somehow relentlessly provocative, but also deeply empathetic. Ricki is pushed to her limits, showing us the immense challenges stacked up against her, as well as the strength and resourcefulness. Hunter is humanized, but not excused, adding complexity to this issue without detracting from its horror. The tension Hannah builds is so engaging that the play flies by, despite its difficult subject. It is also SO politically and socially urgent I cannot believe it hasn't been produced yet.
  • Black Sky
    16 Jan. 2020
    Black Sky is a a gorgeous mixture of humor, poetry, and adventure. It is intriguingly inventive, but familiar enough to be resonant--both in its world-building and use of language. This play manages somehow to be foreboding without becoming dystopian, with stakes that are both epic and personal. Seeing five young women on stage is inherently exciting, but especially when they get to be characters like these. They are real teenagers, but distilled and elevated. They're smart, funny, angsty, determined, wounded, and powerful. Oh and did I mention the theatricality? I could go on but I've literally run out of room.
  • The Geese of El Carmelo Cemetery
    8 Sep. 2016
    Hannah's approach to a difficult topic is both sensitive and creative, drawing us into a world that is equal parts beautiful and devastating. She gives life and depth to characters, making us love them even as they shock us.
  • Ambitious Card
    8 Sep. 2016
    Hannah's mix of spectacle and humor combined with her deft handling of social issues make this play as enjoyable as it is progressive. Its winning protagonist and unique world are characteristic Hannah Langley magic.