Bone is for Dog; Meat is for Man

Bone is for Dog, Meat is for Man is a story that exemplifies a common fear and insecurity women have about their body, appearance and sexuality. It is presented with a comedic undertone and characters that identify the average person living in a world of social media and reliance on the self-reflection of the cyber world. It also taps in to certain social mores associated with body size. There is also an...
Bone is for Dog, Meat is for Man is a story that exemplifies a common fear and insecurity women have about their body, appearance and sexuality. It is presented with a comedic undertone and characters that identify the average person living in a world of social media and reliance on the self-reflection of the cyber world. It also taps in to certain social mores associated with body size. There is also an examination of culturally accepted views on women’s appearance and how one may unconsciously be passing certain fear based behavior of self-worth on to other generations. The story focuses on the life of Layla, a young, early 30s woman and her struggles with her body and her disappointments that she relates to her being “overweight” and thereby “unworthy.” As the story develops, there is a scene that exposes that Layla was a victim of molestation at a young age and blames her mother for not protecting or believing her. There ensues a confrontation between the three generations (grandmother/mother/daughter). Layla struggles with personal relationships. She has a young daughter, Tory that she loves and cherishes; but, she is unaware that her daughter is taking on many of her habits of self-critiquing, negative opinions of her appearance and assigning too much value to what is on the outside.
  • Recommend
  • Download
  • Save to Reading List

Bone is for Dog; Meat is for Man

Recommended by

  • David Hansen:
    15 Apr. 2020
    So many people close to me are tormented by those voices in our heads that tell us we are wrong, what we are doing is wrong, the person that we are is wrong. Bryan's protagnist Layla has a literal person in the mirror who reminds her daily of how far short she has fallen. It's a play with a strong message about body issues, but it's also a romantic comedy and a family drama, a poetic and earthy account about seeking perfection in yourself, and acceptance with what you eventually find. Recommended!
  • Bryan Stubbles:
    17 Oct. 2018
    I highly recommend this play. Of course the play is about self-image, but then it digs so much deeper. This was a very quick read. Wish I had a grandmother like Granny. Good use of dialect and local color. We need more region-centric theatre in the US and here is where it starts - Saint Thomas, US Virgin Islands. Great work.