Rabbit Summer

Wilson and Ruby have the picture perfect marriage (if you're used to seeing positive Black images of family, that is) while Ruby's best friend Claire has just become a statistic, losing her unarmed Black husband to the quick trigger of a white cop. Spiting his Pop's example of manhood, Wilson idealizes his marriage and ignores the controversy of his job as a police officer in the shadow of the...
Wilson and Ruby have the picture perfect marriage (if you're used to seeing positive Black images of family, that is) while Ruby's best friend Claire has just become a statistic, losing her unarmed Black husband to the quick trigger of a white cop. Spiting his Pop's example of manhood, Wilson idealizes his marriage and ignores the controversy of his job as a police officer in the shadow of the BlackLivesMatter movement, smiling through pain Ruby wishes he would share. Tired of feeling helpless and trapped in her Huxtable-like existence, Ruby has been hatching a secret plan to fix the American gun problem while pushing her husband to break out of his plastic shell.
How can you “live your truth” in an America built on lies?
Claire's refuge at the Faison's home unearths long held and brand new secrets and stirs a pot of reality Wilson has never tasted. Can he see life through Ruby's truth and still be the husband and father his mother and he never had?
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Rabbit Summer

Recommended by

  • Juan Ramirez, Jr.:
    1 Mar. 2021
    Tracey Conyer Lee is the playwright that is brave enough to explore the social issues many others are simply afraid to even ask about. This three character play is an analysis for behavior and the significance of honest communication for the sake of survival. We must live our truth but in order to do so, we must also do the work. This means, sometimes stepping out of the chifforobe and other times, it means stepping in. This is a powerful drama!
  • Marj O'Neill-Butler:
    15 Feb. 2020
    This play had me weep unexpectedly. Conyer Lee makes you see all sides of the arguments and stories about being black in this country. A family drama about the things we hide from the people we love and those who love us. A journey of love and hate. Believable dialogue and breath taking confessions. I love this play.
  • Derek Lee McPhatter:
    24 Aug. 2019
    This is a well crafted, funny, character-driven exploration of some of our most pressing social issues: police brutality, gun violence, racial tumult, manhood and ways of loving. A very pointed and well-crafted narrative from Tracey Conyer Lee that deftly moves through tough subject matter without seeming preachy or heavy-handed. It packs quite a few punches, and the humor catches you by surprise. Can't wait to see this on stage.

Character Information

  • Ruby Fasion
    30s-40s,
    African American / Black
    ,
    Female
  • Wilson Faison
    30s-40s,
    African American / Black
    ,
    Male
  • Claire Cooper
    30s-40s,
    African American / Black
    ,
    Female

Development History

  • Workshop
    ,
    JAGfest
    ,
    2019
  • Workshop
    ,
    Women's Voices Festival / Ally Theatre Company
    ,
    2018
  • Reading
    ,
    Page To Stage Festival (Kennedy Center)
    ,
    2017

Production History

  • Professional
    ,
    Aurora Theatre (optioned only)
    ,
    2019
  • Workshop
    ,
    Ally Theatre Company
    ,
    2018

Awards