The Volunteer

In March 1981, Roger Fisher published an article detailing a new, more personal form of nuclear deterrence: The nuclear launch codes would be surgically placed behind a volunteer's beating heart, meaning a president would have to kill one person before killing millions. In this new, surprisingly timely play, Fisher's proposal becomes an alternate 1980s reality.
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The Volunteer

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  • Bill Daniel:
    24 Apr. 2018
    I had the good fortune of listening to this at its first public reading, and I could not more highly recommend it. The deep connection to all of the characters is one of its biggest strengths. There is a sense of urgency, fear, chaos, and at the same time, important interpersonal relationships that knit it all together into an excellent excerise in morality. The monologues are superb, the subject matter is well researched, and it's a damn fine work of art.
  • John Bavoso:
    21 Apr. 2018
    Wow. I love this innovative play, which makes the audience laugh and cry, wryly winking at them all the while. Many plays begin as a thought experiment in a playwright’s mind, but I haven’t encountered one before that dramatizes the process in such a delightfully metatheatrical way. Highly recommended!
  • David Hansen:
    14 Apr. 2018
    The play begins as a "thought experiment" inspired by an op-ed piece which posed a simple question; what if the President had to murder someone with their bare hands in order to retrieve codes to launch a nuclear strike? Playwright Rose has a knack for witty dialogue, but she also knows how to make a strong, convincing argument. At first presentational and satiric, the narrative deftly morphs into an affecting drama with real-world parallels and consequences, at once mythic and intimate. I love plays like this.

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