Power

On the surface, "Power" appears to be a simple locked-room drama. Tucker and Alice are throwing a dinner party. Tucker works for Dean and believes someone at the company is embezzling money. Tucker falls for Dean's wife, Betty. Dean and Tucker's wife, Alice, are having an affair. Everyone is caught. Relationships fall apart. Dinner is a disaster. But this play is not about the...
On the surface, "Power" appears to be a simple locked-room drama. Tucker and Alice are throwing a dinner party. Tucker works for Dean and believes someone at the company is embezzling money. Tucker falls for Dean's wife, Betty. Dean and Tucker's wife, Alice, are having an affair. Everyone is caught. Relationships fall apart. Dinner is a disaster. But this play is not about the words. This play is an exploration of status. "Power" is an ambiguous dialogue. Each night in front of the audience, the cast pulls their status relationships from a hat and must then leap immediately into the play. The entire show exists in the subtext and discoveries happening in real time based upon the luck of the draw. One night, an actor will be the most powerful person on stage, the next night, they will be the outcast. Every show is completely different from performance to performance. Dynamics are fluid, moments are discovered, and the result is a show which is immensely alive. Power isn't about what is being said… it is about everything else.
  • Recommend
  • Download
  • Save to Reading List