[hieroglyph]

Involuntarily displaced in Chicago two months post-Katrina, 13-year-old Davis wrestles with the cultural landscape of a new city and school community while secretly coping with the PTSD of an assault at the Superdome. With her mother still in New Orleans committed to the fight for Black land ownership and her father committed to starting a new life in the Midwest, divorce threatens to further separate a family...
Involuntarily displaced in Chicago two months post-Katrina, 13-year-old Davis wrestles with the cultural landscape of a new city and school community while secretly coping with the PTSD of an assault at the Superdome. With her mother still in New Orleans committed to the fight for Black land ownership and her father committed to starting a new life in the Midwest, divorce threatens to further separate a family already torn apart. Will Davis be left hanging in the balance? [hieroglyph] traverses the intersection of environmental racism, sexual violence, and displacement, examining the psychological effects of a state-sanctioned man-made disaster on the most vulnerable members of the Katrina diaspora.
  • Recommend
  • Download
  • Save to Reading List

[hieroglyph]

Recommended by

  • Cassandra Rose:
    6 Aug. 2019
    I had the wonderful opportunity to see a reading of this play at Victory Garden's Ignition Fest. Wow. Produce this play right now. Never before have I seen a play that takes on the subject of sexual violence with such care and truthfulness. These characters are allowed to be real, to be messy, and to grow with each other. So it's no surprise that the reading of this play got a standing ovation. I'm going to say it again: Produce. This. Play. Right. Now.
  • Katherine Gwynn:
    5 Aug. 2019
    Just saw a reading of this yesterday at Victory Gradens--a raw and visceral play that talks about the breadth of violence done to black women and girls' bodies while still carving out space for tenderness and joy for black women and girls. And you could feel that distinctly in the audience too--the audience was fully engaged ,responding, commenting in the moment, gasping, going silent as a pin--it was breath-taking ot be a part of.
  • Shaun Leisher:
    6 Jul. 2019
    I just finished reading this play and trying to catch my breath. This play genuinely surprised me. I have read plays that covered these issues but never in this way that refuses to give easy answers. Each line and silence is perfectly written to tell this story of silenced people that dealt with trauma in the midst of a catastrophic natural disaster.

Development History

  • Reading
    ,
    The Lark Play Development Center/ New Black Fest
    ,
    2019