Marisa Carr

Marisa Carr

Marisa Carr is playwright who recently transplanted to Chicago after a decade in the Twin Cities. Her work has been presented and/or produced by theaters including: The Guthrie, Milwaukee Rep, Pillsbury House + Theater, the Playwrights’ Center, Intermedia Arts, University of Iowa MFA Program, and Pangea World Theatre. Selected recent awards and honors include: Goodman Playwrights Unit (2020-2021), Scratchpad...
Marisa Carr is playwright who recently transplanted to Chicago after a decade in the Twin Cities. Her work has been presented and/or produced by theaters including: The Guthrie, Milwaukee Rep, Pillsbury House + Theater, the Playwrights’ Center, Intermedia Arts, University of Iowa MFA Program, and Pangea World Theatre. Selected recent awards and honors include: Goodman Playwrights Unit (2020-2021), Scratchpad at the Playwrights' Realm (2019-2020), P73 Finalist (2019-20), American Blues Theater Blue Ink Award Finalist (2020), Bay Area Playwrights’ Festival Finalist (2019), McKnight Fellowship in Playwriting Finalist (2019), Jerome Artist Fellowship Finalist (2019), Lila Acheson Wallace Playwriting Fellowship Semi-finalist (2019), Berkeley Rep Ground Floor Residency (2018), Forward Flux Three New American Plays Commission (2018), Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant (2017), Playwrights’ Center Many Voices Fellow (2016-17), Naked Stages Fellow at Pillsbury House + Theater (2015), and “Best New Political Playwright” (Lavender Magazine, 2014). Marisa is also Co-Founder/former Artistic Director of the Turtle Theater Collective, a Twin Cities-based company committed to producing high-quality, contemporary work that explores Native experiences and subverts expectations about how and when Native artists can create theater. She is Turtle Mountain Ojibwe from the Turtle clan.

Plays

  • Punk Rock Mix Tape Play
    Being a teenage girl is hard, and being a teenage brown girl is harder – but being a teenage brown girl in the punk scene during the post-9/11 Bush administration? That’s something else entirely. This coming-of-age play, loosely structured as a mix tape, sits at the intersection of race, gender, and youth, and explores the cost of finding your place in a world shifting rapidly in ways you barely understand.
  • Sturgeon Play
    Love, fish, and colonialism.
  • Reconciliation
    In a dystopian future, the United States government has initiated a “Truth and Reconciliation” process with Indigenous peoples – and lack of compliance is a federal crime. One woman with nothing left to lose challenges the charge of “Failure to Reconcile” and fights for her life. Is reconciliation possible? And if so, at what cost?
  • Static
    On a cold December evening six strangers’ lives intersect around a single act of desperation, with tragic consequences. Intertwining narratives intersect to explore the impact of law enforcement in marginalized communities.
  • Molly
    Molly Spotted Elk was a Penobscot dancer, actor and writer from the 1920s. This one-woman show illustrates the life of an incredible woman, delves into the little-known history of Native people on-stage, and explores issues of representation and identity that still resonate today.
  • Powwow Summer
    Molly just lost funding for her graduate research on panda bear mating. Sissy's marriage is falling apart. So, in their mid-thirties, these two best friends hit the powwow train to recreate the best summer of their lives -- but a lot has changed since college. As they travel from powwow to powwow, will their past catch up with them? (I mean...It will. Obviously.)