Sheldon Wolf

Sheldon Wolf

SHELDON WOLF has worked in the arts his entire life. As a teenager, he was summer stock technical apprentice and then prop master at the Tappan Zee Playhouse, outside NYC. He completed his BA (Theatre-English) at Queens College (Phi Beta Kappa) and his MFA (Directing) at Brooklyn College. After working as a lighting assistant, literary manager and assorted other positions Off Broadway, he wanted to eat on a...
SHELDON WOLF has worked in the arts his entire life. As a teenager, he was summer stock technical apprentice and then prop master at the Tappan Zee Playhouse, outside NYC. He completed his BA (Theatre-English) at Queens College (Phi Beta Kappa) and his MFA (Directing) at Brooklyn College. After working as a lighting assistant, literary manager and assorted other positions Off Broadway, he wanted to eat on a regular basis and entered the management side of theatre as an unpaid intern at the Chelsea Theater Center. Within months, he headed the marketing department there. In 1977, his play, Blizzard, was produced at the Lion Theatre in NYC. In 1979, he moved to Springfield, Massachusetts to head marketing and development at StageWest. From 1986 to 1999, he was VP of Marketing and Development at the Springfield Library and Museums, followed by top management positions at the High Museum of Art (Atlanta) and the New England Aquarium (Boston). For two years, he chaired the 1100-member Development and Membership Committee of the American Association of Museums. Presently, Sheldon is President of Advancement Company, LLC, a consulting firm based outside Philadelphia. He returned to playwriting several years ago, and among his recent projects are:
• Vanished, a full-length play that won a prize from the Fremont Centre Theatre (CA)
• Miracle Play, a full length play that had a reading at the University of Pennsylvania in 2013
• Brooklyn Quartet, a series of short plays, portions of which had staged readings at the Lawrenceville (NJ) Play Festival and Philadelphia Dramatists Center
• After, which had a staged reading at the Philadelphia Dramatists Center
• And Yet, a short play produced at the Pocket Theatre (NJ) in 2014, directed by Steve Gaissert and scheduled to be part of a showcase production in New York City in 2015
• Shul had a first reading at the Springfield Massachusetts Jewish Community Center in September 2014 and a second reading in December 2014 as part of the Dramatists Guild Philly Footlights Series at the Adrienne Theatre in Philadelphia, directed by Amy Kaissar, former Managing Director of the Bristol Riverside Theatre and co-producer of the forthcoming Broadway production of The Heidi Chronicles.

Plays

  • And Yet
    In this ten minute play, a long-estranged mother and daughter meet just briefly at a bridal salon prior to the daughter's wedding. For most of the piece, the daughter is hidden in the dressing room, but when she finally reveals herself, we discover that she is more like her wayward mother than either might like to admit.
  • Shul
    What happens to the people who are left behind? On the surface, SHUL is the story of the last few members of a desolate old synagogue in a desolate old inner-city neighborhood. On the day of the play, the elder members—surviving behind the mask of humor —gather to decide the fate of the congregation. They are unable to decide, unable to move. Yet, through their jokes, their stories, their heartaches, their...
    What happens to the people who are left behind? On the surface, SHUL is the story of the last few members of a desolate old synagogue in a desolate old inner-city neighborhood. On the day of the play, the elder members—surviving behind the mask of humor —gather to decide the fate of the congregation. They are unable to decide, unable to move. Yet, through their jokes, their stories, their heartaches, their tears, they reveal themselves to each other, forming a bond of community that helps them face the next day…even as the ceiling of their Shul is falling in.

    At first I thought this was “just” a Jewish play, but several of the early readers and many audience members at SHUL’s two readings told me, “That’s my church!” “That’s my town.” “That’s my organization, my club, my family. I know these people.” And ultimately: “That’s me—unable to move and unable to decide.” SHUL, is about us, about the challenge of change.