Danielle Mohlman

Danielle Mohlman

Danielle Mohlman is a nationally produced feminist playwright based in Seattle, WA. Her plays have been developed or produced at Arena Stage, the Kennedy Center, the Cherry Lane Theatre, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, Alliance of Resident Theatres/New York, Rorschach Theatre, Forum Theatre, dog & pony dc, Hubbard Hall, Pinky Swear Productions, Dreamwell Theatre,...
Danielle Mohlman is a nationally produced feminist playwright based in Seattle, WA. Her plays have been developed or produced at Arena Stage, the Kennedy Center, the Cherry Lane Theatre, the National Museum of Women in the Arts, the Sewanee Writers’ Conference, Alliance of Resident Theatres/New York, Rorschach Theatre, Forum Theatre, dog & pony dc, Hubbard Hall, Pinky Swear Productions, Dreamwell Theatre, and Field Trip Theatre, among others. Her plays include Stopgap (Field Trip Theatre, DCCAH Larry Neal Award finalist); Nexus (Hubbard Hall, Dreamwell Theatre, Kilroys honorable mention, DCCAH Larry Neal Award finalist, Woodward/Newman Award finalist); Dust (Eugene O’Neill Theatre Center semi-finalist, Finish Line Commission); Halcyon; and Voyagers. Danielle is an alumna of Playwrights’ Arena at Arena Stage and the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities Artist Fellowship. She is a current member of Umbrella Project’s 2018 Writers Group where she is writing a play about rape and college football. Danielle is a graduate of Emerson College.

Plays

  • Frankenstein
    based on the novel by Mary Shelley

    When Mary Shelley sits down to write Frankenstein, she’s 18 years old with everything to prove. Her husband, the poet Percy Shelley, is too in his head to notice his wife’s phenomenal talent. She’s grieving the death of her infant daughter. And in this era of gothic literature, no one wants to believe that the darkness on the page mirrors the storm in her own...
    based on the novel by Mary Shelley

    When Mary Shelley sits down to write Frankenstein, she’s 18 years old with everything to prove. Her husband, the poet Percy Shelley, is too in his head to notice his wife’s phenomenal talent. She’s grieving the death of her infant daughter. And in this era of gothic literature, no one wants to believe that the darkness on the page mirrors the storm in her own head. That is, until her mother shows up. The only problem is, Mary Wollstonecraft died when Shelley was just ten days old.

    This adaptation of Mary Shelley’s classic novel explores monsters and the women who create them. It’s a play that asks the age old question: How far would you go to to outrun your ghosts?

    (This play is completely high school appropriate and perfect for school productions.)
  • Rushing
    **This play is actively in development.

    Russell and Mia meet minutes before the first football game of the season. He's the star running back, she plays the sousaphone in the university marching band. No one ever pictured them together. But they are. And in a weird way they're good for each other. Until they're not. Rushing explores the culture of violence, the fanaticism...
    **This play is actively in development.

    Russell and Mia meet minutes before the first football game of the season. He's the star running back, she plays the sousaphone in the university marching band. No one ever pictured them together. But they are. And in a weird way they're good for each other. Until they're not. Rushing explores the culture of violence, the fanaticism surrounding Division I sports, and rape on college campuses nationwide.

    This play takes place in your town. The team is wearing your colors. And yes, there's a live marching band scoring this entire world.
  • Voyagers
    A play by Danielle Mohlman from an original concept by Maureen Monterubio.

    Once every 175 years, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune align in such a way that – with the help of the slingshot quality of gravity assist – a spacecraft can reach each of the outer planets. This is a play about that once in a lifetime moment.

    Bobbie wants to retire, but after forty years at NASA it...
    A play by Danielle Mohlman from an original concept by Maureen Monterubio.

    Once every 175 years, Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune align in such a way that – with the help of the slingshot quality of gravity assist – a spacecraft can reach each of the outer planets. This is a play about that once in a lifetime moment.

    Bobbie wants to retire, but after forty years at NASA it's difficult to walk away. Helen is watching her daughter find her footing at the space agency, all while starting a new career as a physics professor in the post-Space Shuttle era. Joanna is at the beginning of her career, falling in love with spacecrafts and astronauts through coding and stargazing. And Grace is navigating a new realm as both the commander of the International Space Station and the lone female on board.

    As for Voyager 1 and Voyager 2, they’ve made a pact with Bobbie to share everything the human eye can’t comprehend, sending messages through the galaxy – all to the soundtrack of the Golden Records they carry and the siren call of the planet Saturn.
  • Halcyon
    When Annie arrives in Seattle for the weekend, she has two objectives: watch her brother Will graduate from the MBA program at the University of Washington and hook up with that piece of man meat she’s been objectifying for the last two years. It’s mutual, or so she thinks. Without warning, Ben is proposing marriage — citing latent Judaism and a lucrative new job. And Annie isn’t totally opposed to the idea....
    When Annie arrives in Seattle for the weekend, she has two objectives: watch her brother Will graduate from the MBA program at the University of Washington and hook up with that piece of man meat she’s been objectifying for the last two years. It’s mutual, or so she thinks. Without warning, Ben is proposing marriage — citing latent Judaism and a lucrative new job. And Annie isn’t totally opposed to the idea. But then again, neither of them has really thought this through. Utilizing a percussive personification of anxiety’s relationship to technology, Halcyon explores long distance friendship, hasty decisions, moral grey areas, and — oh yeah — the 2016 election.
  • Dust
    Wrestling with the reality that everyone he's ever known was just killed in a shooting at his school, Boy spends his last minutes spinning a story that looks not unlike J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan. These young women, these mermaids, compete to be heard as their story unfolds. They are the swim team – powerful and sometimes monstrous. And then there’s Wendy. His Wendy. Boy is convinced that she’s the only...
    Wrestling with the reality that everyone he's ever known was just killed in a shooting at his school, Boy spends his last minutes spinning a story that looks not unlike J.M. Barrie’s Peter Pan. These young women, these mermaids, compete to be heard as their story unfolds. They are the swim team – powerful and sometimes monstrous. And then there’s Wendy. His Wendy. Boy is convinced that she’s the only person who understands him. Until she doesn’t. Part dance, part theatre, Dust plays like a music score that’s been infiltrated by poetry, giving voice to the unspeakable.
  • Nexus
    Metaphorically set in the Museum of Broken Relationships, this chamber drama follows two iPhone-armed DC transplants as they drift between intimacy and disconnect. The play opens with W and M – strangers – waiting for a bus. Their eyes wander and W is quick to mention that she has a boyfriend. But they’re on a break. Because he doesn’t want to call it a “relationship” anymore. M asks for her phone, offering his...
    Metaphorically set in the Museum of Broken Relationships, this chamber drama follows two iPhone-armed DC transplants as they drift between intimacy and disconnect. The play opens with W and M – strangers – waiting for a bus. Their eyes wander and W is quick to mention that she has a boyfriend. But they’re on a break. Because he doesn’t want to call it a “relationship” anymore. M asks for her phone, offering his much newer model as collateral. He enters his number and what follows are the moments that would be on display if they were living exhibits in the Museum of Broken Relationships.
  • Stopgap
    May wants to get pregnant. David wants to adopt. Robert just wants pizza. In a town where white picket fences and 2.5 kids has long been the norm, a prospective single mother, her best friend, and his husband are no strangers to defying convention. This dark comedy explores how these individuals try to find their own definitions of “family” in this heteronormative community they call home.