Jayne Deely

Jayne Deely

Jayne Deely (they/them) is a playwright and performer from Queens, NY, the collaboration between a Puerto Rican mom from East Harlem and a former Catholic priest father from Pittsburgh, PA, leading to a lot of work about privilege, gender, and lingering Catholicism. Jayne’s work has been developed with KCACTF at the Kennedy Center, American Stage, the New Harmony Writers’ Conference, Renaissance Theatreworks,...
Jayne Deely (they/them) is a playwright and performer from Queens, NY, the collaboration between a Puerto Rican mom from East Harlem and a former Catholic priest father from Pittsburgh, PA, leading to a lot of work about privilege, gender, and lingering Catholicism. Jayne’s work has been developed with KCACTF at the Kennedy Center, American Stage, the New Harmony Writers’ Conference, Renaissance Theatreworks, and Coe College, among others. They are a 2024 O’Neill Playwrights’ Conference finalist, two time semi-finalist, two-time winner of the Latinx Playwriting Award, including Distinguished Achievement for the Paula Vogel Award, with KCACTF, and a recent Dramatist Guild Foundation National Fellows Finalist, 2024. MFA Playwriting, IU Bloomington. BA, Fordham College Lincoln Center, Honors College. Proud member of AEA, SAG-AFTRA, Dramatists’ Guild.

Plays

  • I never asked for a gofundme
    When Millie is granted a prestigious fellowship in her hometown of Mobile, AL, she and her partner Avery, who is on the cusp of gender affirming top surgery, temporarily relocate to a hometown full of ghosts and the whispers of neighbors who can't understand how a nice girl like Millie could throw away the heterosexual life of service they all envisioned for her (surely it's Avery's fault sweet...
    When Millie is granted a prestigious fellowship in her hometown of Mobile, AL, she and her partner Avery, who is on the cusp of gender affirming top surgery, temporarily relocate to a hometown full of ghosts and the whispers of neighbors who can't understand how a nice girl like Millie could throw away the heterosexual life of service they all envisioned for her (surely it's Avery's fault sweet Millie doesn't go to church anymore). On a routine trip to pick up meds in the wake of Avery's surgery, Millie's innocent conversation with the pharmacist is overheard by Teresa, best friend of Millie's mom and quasi aunt to Millie, who puts together the snippets of conversation and wrongly assumes that Avery has breast cancer. Zealous woman of God that she is, Teresa immediately springs into action, rallying the church troops and organizing a gofundme to SAVE AVERY! Cue casseroles, checkbooks, and care packages.

    As the clock of March Madness winds down, Millie attempts to manage her mom and Teresa, while grappling with what it means to return home when ‘home’ only seems to want the old version of you. Meanwhile, Avery is faced with an impossibly absurd choice – is it lying to not out themselves to refute a story they never told to begin with?

    "I never asked for a gofundme" is a new queer comedy about the reality of gender affirming care, religion, and motherhood.
  • unqle play
    unqle play is the story of uncle and fave, both gay, one sober, one not, one dying, one not, navigating their relationship, their history, and their shared legacy within the context of one epic last conversation. It is a 90-minute negotiation of terms of what it means to tell someone’s story, how much we can ask of those who leave us, and what it means to say goodbye.

    Using the shared love...
    unqle play is the story of uncle and fave, both gay, one sober, one not, one dying, one not, navigating their relationship, their history, and their shared legacy within the context of one epic last conversation. It is a 90-minute negotiation of terms of what it means to tell someone’s story, how much we can ask of those who leave us, and what it means to say goodbye.

    Using the shared love language of the musical theatre canon, the somewhat shared language of recovery, and a conflicting, sometimes fraught understanding of what it means to be a member of the LGBTQIA+ community, guncle play is a highly theatrical exploration of love, grief, and the shifting values of the queer community. As we transition (pun intended) into a world in which gay marriage is legal (for now) and the fight for trans rights has begun to take center stage, we watch two people who love each other fiercely come together and fall apart as niece moves into their moment and uncle faces the rising tide of both mortality and an existential feeling of being erased.

    Experience this two-hander vaudevillian journey of love, grief, Sondheim, and community through time, a titanic debate of queerness within multiple generations of the same family that asks ‘how do we both honor the work of those on whose shoulders we stand while also taking ownership of our moment?’
  • Walter Mercado presents: a queer Puerto Rican (not just) Christmas Spectacular
    We all need a little help sometimes. Identity is confusing. Dating is HARD. Some of us go to therapy. And some of us – wait until it gets bad enough that our dead abuela sends three Puerto Rican ancestors/pop culture icons our way on Christmas Eve to get us back on track by taking us on a tour of our past, present, and future.
    Meet Zee. It was just supposed to be three dates, but Walter Mercado has other...
    We all need a little help sometimes. Identity is confusing. Dating is HARD. Some of us go to therapy. And some of us – wait until it gets bad enough that our dead abuela sends three Puerto Rican ancestors/pop culture icons our way on Christmas Eve to get us back on track by taking us on a tour of our past, present, and future.
    Meet Zee. It was just supposed to be three dates, but Walter Mercado has other plans.

    A spin on the classic Christmas Carol story about queerness, Puerto Rico, friendship, and accepting a helping hand from the ancestors.

    Oh, and sobre todo mucho, mucho, mucho ...

    Not yet.
  • Waycross, an audio/stage hybrid play
    Lee is one of the CIA’s finest assets, but the grind is starting to get to her. Her only friends are her boss at the CIA and her arch-nemesis MI6 agent Olivia Winston Davies. When their newest mission sends them to a small town in Georgia to infiltrate a community theatre posing as something called a – dramaturg? – she wants nothing to do with it. But she soon realizes that there’s more to saving the world than...
    Lee is one of the CIA’s finest assets, but the grind is starting to get to her. Her only friends are her boss at the CIA and her arch-nemesis MI6 agent Olivia Winston Davies. When their newest mission sends them to a small town in Georgia to infiltrate a community theatre posing as something called a – dramaturg? – she wants nothing to do with it. But she soon realizes that there’s more to saving the world than she imagined, and they will need all of their training, instincts, and maybe even a little help from her friends, to make it to opening night.
  • 30 Seconds
    Max is a precocious kid, overachieving and a little anxious, sure, but mostly well adjusted. She’s got a lot going on, but she’s on top of it. Adult supervision not required. Besides, it’s 1999, what could go wrong?

    Dr. C is a child psychologist recently dubbed the ‘child whisperer;’ her professional life is on a steady upward trajectory. Unfortunately the same can’t be said for her personal life...
    Max is a precocious kid, overachieving and a little anxious, sure, but mostly well adjusted. She’s got a lot going on, but she’s on top of it. Adult supervision not required. Besides, it’s 1999, what could go wrong?

    Dr. C is a child psychologist recently dubbed the ‘child whisperer;’ her professional life is on a steady upward trajectory. Unfortunately the same can’t be said for her personal life. Enter Max.

    When Max starts receiving threatening notes at school, she embarks on a hunt for the culprit in this pre-Y2K whodunit that what asks us what it means to be a kid in a chaotic world, and leaves us wondering if we’ve been looking in the wrong place all along.
  • Outraged
    When a college senior begins a crusade against the head of her department for bringing a prominent white male lecturer in after promising to diversify the program, she places herself at the forefront of a fight she might not be willing to go all in on. A classroom play about white fragility, moral outrage, and the pervasiveness of privilege that asks what 'the work' really looks like.
  • A Home Bar Means You're Fine
    A normal zoom game night because game nights on zoom mean you're fine.

    Written as a Beckett inspired play in May of 2020 for a class at Indiana University Bloomington taught by Liz Duffy Adams.