Alice Eve Cohen

Alice Eve Cohen

Alice Eve Cohen is a playwright, solo theatre artist, and author, whose plays and solo works have been performed for over 250,000 people on four continents. She won the 2019 Jane Chambers Playwriting Award for her dark comedy In the Cervix of Others. Her solo play What I Thought I Knew, an O’Neill finalist and nominee for 5 regional Broadway World Awards including Best Play, is adapted from her memoir—published...
Alice Eve Cohen is a playwright, solo theatre artist, and author, whose plays and solo works have been performed for over 250,000 people on four continents. She won the 2019 Jane Chambers Playwriting Award for her dark comedy In the Cervix of Others. Her solo play What I Thought I Knew, an O’Neill finalist and nominee for 5 regional Broadway World Awards including Best Play, is adapted from her memoir—published by Viking, winner of the Elle Grand Prize for Nonfiction and O Oprah magazine’s 25 Best Books of Summer.

Cohen’s plays have been produced/developed at theatres including: The Kitchen Theatre, New York Theatre Workshop (Just Add Water and O Solo Mio festivals), The New Georges, Minnesota Jewish Theatre, Dance Theatre Workshop, Here Arts Center, EST, All for One Theatre, Cherry Lane Theatre, Theatre for the New City, 78th Street Theatre Lab, Ko Festival, Jewish Repertory Theatre of Western NY, The Women’s Project, The Performing Garage, Philadelphia Women’s Theatre Festival, LA Women’s Theatre Festival, Cincinnati Playhouse in the Park, Tampa Bay Performing Arts Center, Hudson Opera House, KiMo Theatre, Theatre for the New City, RVCC Arts, Artscape, Proctors Theatre, University of Michigan, Barnard, Fordham University, University of Baltimore, Smithsonian Institution’s Discovery Theatre, Bayview Women’s Correctional Facility; and internationally at Galway Theatre Festival, Edinburgh Fringe Festival, Trinidad’s Astor Theatre, Jerusalem’s Theatre Bama.

Cohen has written television for Nickelodeon and CBS, her books are published by Penguin, Algonquin, and Simon & Schuster, and a collection of her solo plays is published by NoPassport Press. The founding Editor of Play by Play, Theatre Development Fund’s theatre journal by and for teens, she is on the reading/adjudicating committee for the Bridge Playwriting Contest sponsored by Arts in the Armed Forces. A proud member of Ensemble Studio Theatre, EST’s Playwrights Unit, New York Theatre Workshop Usual Suspects, and Honor Roll!, she has received fellowships and grants from the NY State Council on the Arts, the NEA, Virginia Center for Creative Arts, and Poets & Writers. Cohen holds an MFA from The New School, a BA from Princeton University, and a screenwriting certificate from the School of Media Studies. She teaches playwriting and creative writing at The New School Creative Writing Program and is a playwriting mentor for the MFA program of Augsburg College. www.AliceEveCohen.com
Selected quotes:

“A little show, but with such a big, embracing heart,” The Guardian (London).

"Gripping..." The New York Times

“So vivid, so immediate, so complex, so full of compassion… This is what theater can be.”—Tompkins Weekly, Ithaca

“This play takes us on a gripping ride."—Minnesota Star Tribune, BEST OF THE WEEK

"While filled with Cohen’s characteristic warmth and humor, What I Thought I Knew indicts the health care system."—Jewish Week

“Joyful, heart-breaking, moving”—Cherry and Spoon, Minneapolis

“Throws the insanity of the American health care system into sharp relief…sobering and thought-provoking.”—City Pages, Minneapolis/St. Paul

"Profound… [a] darkly comedic reframing of iconic feminist questions around choice, parenting, and women's health… Challenging, beautiful, and defiantly funny "—Jane Chambers Award judging committee

“Hilarious, heartbreaking, hopeful and devastating all at once.”—Minnesota Post, THE PICKS


Plays

  • In the Cervix of Others
    Jessica is at her gynecological exam in 2018, during the Kavanaugh/Ford hearing, and simultaneously in 1991, during the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill hearing. Woven into this time-traveling dark comedy is a mother-daughter tale of recrimination and forgiveness, an older woman reconciling with her younger self, a true story of pharmaceutical corruption, and the journey of a woman urgently trying to find her voice....
    Jessica is at her gynecological exam in 2018, during the Kavanaugh/Ford hearing, and simultaneously in 1991, during the Clarence Thomas/Anita Hill hearing. Woven into this time-traveling dark comedy is a mother-daughter tale of recrimination and forgiveness, an older woman reconciling with her younger self, a true story of pharmaceutical corruption, and the journey of a woman urgently trying to find her voice. Jessica’s cervix is being filmed for a training video. While Dr. Cooperman narrates her cervix’s perilous prenatal history, Jessica floats off the examining table and performs a stand-up routine on the ceiling. Her out-of-body storytelling launches her on an odyssey, during which she befriends the mythological Philomela from Ovid’s Metamorphoses, whose ancient story has powerful contemporary resonance. Against the backdrop of the Kavanaugh and Thomas hearings, which play out on screens throughout the action of the play, Jessica finds a window into her past and reunites with her late mother. Their relationship is a stormy mix of ambivalence and love, filled with recriminations for events of the past over which they had no control. With emotional force and hilarious wit, the play explores the many ways women are silenced, the misogyny that taints women’s healthcare, and the transcendent power of mother-daughter love. IN THE CERVIX OF OTHERS is a riveting journey, funny, painful and absurd.
    To inquire about reading or producing the play, contact the playwright or literary agent, Elaine Devlin at Edevlinlit@aol.com
  • What I Thought I Knew
    Everything 44-year-old Alice thought she knew is turned upside-down when an emergency CAT scan reveals that she’s six months pregnant. A dark comedy performed by one actress playing forty roles, Alice faces the most wrenching decision a woman can make, in her odyssey through doubt, a broken health-care system, the complexities of reproductive rights, and the infinite unpredictability of parenthood. An O’Neill...
    Everything 44-year-old Alice thought she knew is turned upside-down when an emergency CAT scan reveals that she’s six months pregnant. A dark comedy performed by one actress playing forty roles, Alice faces the most wrenching decision a woman can make, in her odyssey through doubt, a broken health-care system, the complexities of reproductive rights, and the infinite unpredictability of parenthood. An O’Neill finalist and Jane Chambers Award Honorable Mention, What I Thought I Knew is adapted from Cohen's acclaimed memoir—winner of Oprah magazine’s 25 Best Books of Summer and Elle Literary Grand Prize for Nonfiction.
    Selected quotes, What I Thought I Knew:
    “Hilarious, heartbreaking, hopeful and devastating all at once.”
    —Minnesota Post, THE PICKS
    “So vivid, so immediate, so complex, so full of compassion… This is what theater can be.”—Tompkins Weekly, Ithaca

    “This play takes us on a gripping ride."—Minnesota Star Tribune, BEST OF THE WEEK
    "While filled with Cohen’s characteristic warmth and humor, What I Thought I Knew indicts the health care system."—Jewish Week

    “Joyful, heart-breaking, moving”—Cherry and Spoon, Minneapolis

    “Throws the insanity of the American health care system into sharp relief…sobering and thought-provoking.”—City Pages, Minneapolis/​St. Paul

    "Profound… [a] darkly comedic reframing of iconic feminist questions around choice, parenting, and women's health… Challenging, beautiful, and defiantly funny "—Jane Chambers Award, Honorable Mention for new feminist plays
  • Mrs. Satan and the Nasty Woman
    Victoria Woodhull, the very first woman to run for president, is arrested and jailed right before the election of 1872. On the eve of the 2016 election, Hillary Clinton is having a hard time sleeping. Her mind is racing. Insomnia rules. Every time she thinks she has awakened, she finds herself in the Ludlow Street Jail in NYC, sharing a cell with Victoria Woodhull. Almost erased from the history books, Victoria...
    Victoria Woodhull, the very first woman to run for president, is arrested and jailed right before the election of 1872. On the eve of the 2016 election, Hillary Clinton is having a hard time sleeping. Her mind is racing. Insomnia rules. Every time she thinks she has awakened, she finds herself in the Ludlow Street Jail in NYC, sharing a cell with Victoria Woodhull. Almost erased from the history books, Victoria was a clairvoyant, free-thinker, radical activist, stockbroker, and suffrage fighter. Will Hillary be radicalized by Victoria’s foresight and revolutionary politics? Will she finally have a night’s rest? Playwright Alice Eve Cohen examines two women's roles in the long path to a woman President in MRS. SATAN AND THE NASTY WOMAN.

    Commissioned by the Kitchen Theatre Company, Ithaca, NY

  • Oklahoma Samovar
    In 1887, two Latvian teenagers, Jake and Hattie, flee the Russian Army and become the only Jews in the Oklahoma Land Rush. One hundred years later, their ninety-year-old daughter Sylvia reinvents their story, aided by ghosts, blintzes and strong Russian tea. Traveling through time, five generations in a Jewish pioneer family travel East to West and then West to East, staking their claims in Kansas, Oklahoma,...
    In 1887, two Latvian teenagers, Jake and Hattie, flee the Russian Army and become the only Jews in the Oklahoma Land Rush. One hundred years later, their ninety-year-old daughter Sylvia reinvents their story, aided by ghosts, blintzes and strong Russian tea. Traveling through time, five generations in a Jewish pioneer family travel East to West and then West to East, staking their claims in Kansas, Oklahoma, and Coney Island. Along the way, they put down roots and dig graves, embodying their own Jewish variations on the mythologized and turbulent American Dream. Based on real events, Oklahoma Samovar is an utterly human and absolutely unique American story.

  • HANNAH AND THE HOLLOW CHALLAH (a play for family audiences
    Hannah and the Hollow Challah is a comic play for 2-10 actors playing dozens of roles (and rolls.) Hannah goes berserk over challah, her favorite bread. One day she eats the inside of an entire loaf. The next instant, she finds herself inside the hollow challah, which flies out Hannah’s kitchen window and all the way to Bread Land, where the inhabitants are all… bread! Hilarious, hi-carb complications ensue....
    Hannah and the Hollow Challah is a comic play for 2-10 actors playing dozens of roles (and rolls.) Hannah goes berserk over challah, her favorite bread. One day she eats the inside of an entire loaf. The next instant, she finds herself inside the hollow challah, which flies out Hannah’s kitchen window and all the way to Bread Land, where the inhabitants are all… bread! Hilarious, hi-carb complications ensue. Hannah’s journey of personal discovery gives depth to the wild escapades of the show’s human and doughy characters. She learns to use her courage and creativity to overcome monumental challenges. By journey’s end, she accepts her artistic instincts and realizes that she needs to reshape tradition in order to be her authentic self.
    SELECTED QUOTES:
    "Alice travels down a rabbit hole, Dorothy journeys in a tornado-propelled house, and Hannah—well, Hannah goes to another world in a hollowed-out loaf of challah. In this new comedy for ages 4 to 12 by Alice Eve Cohen, Hannah's trip takes her to Bread Land."
    --The New York Times

    “It was probably the funniest show I have ever seen!”
    —Daniel, age 7

    “About a girl discovering her hidden gifts. 'Hannah' [has] relevance to the world of contemporary Jewish artists, who rework Jewish themes to create new artistic styles...Even Hannah’s mother...needs to bend and reshape Jewish tradition in order to be her authentic self."
    - The Jewish Week

    "A delicious adventure through Bread Land. Our heroine, Hannah, uses courage, creativity and a bright, spunky spirit to overcome monumental challenges. A smart and adorable show. I highly recommend it."
    —Marianna Houston, Education Director, TDF (Theatre Development Fund)

    “Hannah and the Hollow Challah is a great play for the whole family. I brought my family, and they loved it. It is filled with witty humor the adults will enjoy, and eye-catching props and wonderful acting which keeps children engaged. As a 3rd teacher, I would highly recommend this play for school groups and families.”
    —Chris Miller, 3rd grade teacher, PS 199, New York City

    "Hannah and the Hollow Challah celebrates the imagination, something Lesley Greene, the associate producing director of the Kitchen Theatre Company, appreciates. "We picked this play because we were familiar with and love Alice Eve Cohen’s work, and because the script was so much fun to read!" Greene said in an e-mail interview. "It is a sweet story told in a very clever way. It has lessons about consequences of being naughty, about bravery and helping friends, and about following your heart, but all these lessons are shared in such a way that kids won’t feel they are being lectured. It’s fun through and through." She noted, that while the play is aimed at children ages four and older, their parents should love it too."
    - The Reporter Group.org http://www.thereportergroup.org/article.aspx?aid=684