Bill Lattanzi

Bill Lattanzi

Bill Lattanzi’s plays have been produced in many venues across New England and in New York City. From 2000-2005, he was Artist-in-Residence at Brandeis University, where he taught in the graduate playwriting program and created the Blender festival of new student work. He holds a Master's degree in playwriting from Boston University, and in 2001, was awarded the Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist'...
Bill Lattanzi’s plays have been produced in many venues across New England and in New York City. From 2000-2005, he was Artist-in-Residence at Brandeis University, where he taught in the graduate playwriting program and created the Blender festival of new student work. He holds a Master's degree in playwriting from Boston University, and in 2001, was awarded the Massachusetts Cultural Council Artist's Grant for Playwriting/New Theater Works. His plays include: One-Hit Wonder, Dancing Downstream, (finalist for the O'Neill National Playwrights Conference), La Vita Claire, (winner of the New England Theater Conference John Gassner Memorial Theater Award), Citizen Kane at Heaven's Gate, (commissioned by the children's theater Andy's Summer Playhouse), Fitness America, and Pictures of Patty Hearst. His 10 minutes plays, France, Sam Spade, and 10/11, are available in Baker's Plays Boston Theater Marathon collections; other 10-minutes plays include A Raft Made of Grass, and Let’s Get Meta! Bill is a co-founder of the Boston Theater Marathon and a three-time finalist for the Actor Theater of Louisville's Heideman Award. Theaters include: in Boston, Centastage, New Rep, Boston Playwrights Theater; in New York, The Lark, Samuel Beckett, West Bank Theater Café; in Providence, The Newgate.

Plays

  • Never Gonna Let You Go (2019)
    An inappropriate love story. Cynthia, 20, whipsmart, a senior at an elite women's college, carries dark secrets. The first is the affair with her professor, a local theater legend since she was underage, freshman year. Aging, alcoholic Martin is an impressive performer and teacher, but he's fired when he's caught with Cynthia. Cynthia drops out of school to live with Martin in a rat-trap of a...
    An inappropriate love story. Cynthia, 20, whipsmart, a senior at an elite women's college, carries dark secrets. The first is the affair with her professor, a local theater legend since she was underage, freshman year. Aging, alcoholic Martin is an impressive performer and teacher, but he's fired when he's caught with Cynthia. Cynthia drops out of school to live with Martin in a rat-trap of a place. Meanwhile her wealthy father, with whom she has a charged relationship, to say the least, is out to find her and press charges against Martin. At curtain, the father is on the hunt for them, and may be in town. Tim, an actor in his 20s, shows up at his idol's home for a scheduled reading of Waiting for Godot. Martin's forgotten all about it. Martin and Cynthia's bizarre relationship and aggressive games-playing bewilders Tim, but the comedy turns dark with an act of violence. Secrets are spilled, lives are on the line, and Cynthia turns from object to subject to protagonist to hero... rejecting both the overt abuser and the on-the-surface nice guy savior figure... Cynthia gets out.
  • Let's Get Meta (10 minutes)
    An estranged wife holds a gun on her husband as he demands she sign the divorce papers. Enter the critic, bitterly complaining about the quality of the writing. Poor playwright Roy is beset by both his characters and his inner critic as he tries to write. The characters take over, point out that the critic is in reality Roy's disapproving father. Roy breaks down, father and son reconcile and exit, and the...
    An estranged wife holds a gun on her husband as he demands she sign the divorce papers. Enter the critic, bitterly complaining about the quality of the writing. Poor playwright Roy is beset by both his characters and his inner critic as he tries to write. The characters take over, point out that the critic is in reality Roy's disapproving father. Roy breaks down, father and son reconcile and exit, and the characters can finally play their scene. A post-mod play whose thesis is that no post-mod play can be successful... but is successful.
  • Pictures of Patty Hearst
    Two months after her kidnapping by a small band of revolutionaries, 19 year-old heiress Patricia Hearst condemned her parents, took a new name, and joined her captor's cause. "The self," a psychiatrist stated at her trial for bank robbery two years later, "turns out to be a fragile thing." Pictures of Patty Hearst is a fictive theatrical journey based on the public record. In a...
    Two months after her kidnapping by a small band of revolutionaries, 19 year-old heiress Patricia Hearst condemned her parents, took a new name, and joined her captor's cause. "The self," a psychiatrist stated at her trial for bank robbery two years later, "turns out to be a fragile thing." Pictures of Patty Hearst is a fictive theatrical journey based on the public record. In a swirl of non-linear scenes, the Hearst saga is presented by an ensemble cast of six, all of whom save Patty herself play multiple characters, sometimes shifting within a scene. From the role-playing revolutionaries who met in acting class, to the religious experiences of Patty's youth, to her ultimately mysterious conversion and renunciation, the play explores the the deep-seated human desire for absolute answers in an uncertain world.

    The setting is abstract. A shadow screen is the only fixed element, though many set pieces and props -- a bathtub, a barrel full of disguises and weapons -- roll on and off stage. The shadow screen is used at different times in the play to suggest both the reductive frame of the television set and of expansive unknowable mysteries. Scene changes are sometimes made by actors changing character. Theatrical styles within the play shift from naturalistic to presentational to poetic. Satirical, political, violent, dramatic and comic moods sit side by side; are sometimes simultaneous. Sound will play an important role, some of it loud and unpleasant. Finally, Patty finds a way out -- she becomes a delightful, well-liked talk show guest, the past neatly tied up into a televisual morsel. Except that it keeps escaping its box.