Allison Gregory

Allison Gregory

Allison Gregory’s plays have been produced widely and she has received
commissions, grants, and development from Oregon Shakespeare Festival,
The Kennedy Center, South Coast Repertory, Indiana Repertory Theatre,
the Skirball-Kenis Foundation, GEVA, Seattle Repertory Theatre, ACT Theater,
Orlando Shakespeare Festival, New Harmony Project, Northwest Playwright’s
Alliance,...
Allison Gregory’s plays have been produced widely and she has received
commissions, grants, and development from Oregon Shakespeare Festival,
The Kennedy Center, South Coast Repertory, Indiana Repertory Theatre,
the Skirball-Kenis Foundation, GEVA, Seattle Repertory Theatre, ACT Theater,
Orlando Shakespeare Festival, New Harmony Project, Northwest Playwright’s
Alliance, Seattle Children’s Theatre, LATC, Amphibian Stage Productions,
Theatre Lab@FAU, BANFF Playwright’s Lab, and Austin Scriptworks.
Her work has been the recipient of the Julie Harris Playwriting Award, South Coast Repertory’s Playwright’s Award (Forcing Hyacinths), Garland & Dramalogue
Awards (Fall Off Night, Breathing Room), and Seattle Times Best New Play Award (Burning Bridget Cleary). Plays include Not Medea (O’Neill & BAPF finalist, National New Play Network Rolling World Premiere); Wild Horses (O’Neill semi-
finalist, NNPN RWP); Motherland (O’Neill finalist, American Blues Blue Ink Award finalist, Harriet Lake Playfest selection, NNPN Showcase of New Plays). Her play Darling Boud (as in Loud) was recently presented in the Ruth Easton New Play reading series at The Playwright’s Center. She is currently working on a play about silent film actress and renegade Louise Brooks, commissioned by Geva Theatre, and a comedy about treason.

Allison’s plays for young audiences include Go Dog. Go!, adapted from the P.D.
Eastman book and co-written with Steven Dietz; Even Steven Goes to War (“Zoni” Best
New Script Award; AATE and UPRP awards; Kennedy Center New Visions/New Voices
selection); Peter and the Wolf (Seattle Times Best New Play Award; National tour), Junie
B. in Jingle Bells, Batman Smells!, and Junie B. is Not A Crook (over 200 professional
productions), adapted from the beloved book series by Barbara Park. Ronia, the Robber’s
Daughter, adapted from Astrid Lindgren’s story, premiered at Teatr Pinokio in Poland and had its U.S. premiere this year. Her adaptation of Judy Moody & Stink is a seven-theatre commission premiering at all seven theatres through 2019. Allison is a Core Member of the Playwright’s Center and an alumni of LATC’S Wordsmiths and Hedgebrook. She splits her time between Seattle and Austin, where she is the co-founder of the Marthas, a playwright collective. Her plays are published by Playscripts, Smith & Krauss, Dramatic Publishing, and Rain City Press. http://allisongregoryplays.com/




Plays

  • The Loyals
    Meet Peggy Shipman: young, bright, socially prominent, politically ambivalent.
    At eighteen she becomes Mrs. Benedict Arnold. But wait -- is she a knowing partner in her infamous husband’s treason? Is she playing a conniving role in his outrageous attempt to destroy a adolescent country fighting for its independence? Or is she merely a naïve spouse, betrayed along with George Washington and the rest of...
    Meet Peggy Shipman: young, bright, socially prominent, politically ambivalent.
    At eighteen she becomes Mrs. Benedict Arnold. But wait -- is she a knowing partner in her infamous husband’s treason? Is she playing a conniving role in his outrageous attempt to destroy a adolescent country fighting for its independence? Or is she merely a naïve spouse, betrayed along with George Washington and the rest of America? And how does she get her hair so high?
    The Loyals is a gripping investigation into espionage and patriotism during the American Revolution – and the greatest act of disloyalty this young country had ever seen. History is the fundamental lens through which we view the present. With this romantic comedy about treason, I seek to investigate the intersection of historical fact and my own narrative invention, while telling a two-hundred and forty year-old narrative that throws light and resonance on today’s political shenanigans.
  • Motherland
    A self-made woman does her crafty best to protect her wayward children, keep her food truck business thriving, and impart some kind of moral code in an inner city battling collapse. In Motherland grit, guile, and guns are everyday parenting tools, and hope comes at a cost. A funny, raw, timely new play inspired by Mother Courage and Her Children.
  • Not Medea
    What if the show you came to see is not the show you need to see? A working mother escapes to the sanctuary of the theatre and manipulates the show-- and the audience, inadvertently sharing her own conflicted story. Straddling the worlds of myth, magic, and today’s headlines, Not Medea is one woman's intimate tale that every parent will relate to, told in a boldly theatrical setting. Fiercely funny and...
    What if the show you came to see is not the show you need to see? A working mother escapes to the sanctuary of the theatre and manipulates the show-- and the audience, inadvertently sharing her own conflicted story. Straddling the worlds of myth, magic, and today’s headlines, Not Medea is one woman's intimate tale that every parent will relate to, told in a boldly theatrical setting. Fiercely funny and unsettling, brutally raw and surprising, her arresting story is one of love, tragedy, and unexpected hope.

  • Wild Horses
    A savagely-funny play about a summer that changed an adolescent girl forever, told by her grown-up self. As her friends challenge and cajole her and her family falls apart around her, she questions the core of her own humanity. The pathos and hubris of teenage years, the struggle for identity, independence, and authenticity, and the desire to find one's place in a complicated world — it all come rushing at...
    A savagely-funny play about a summer that changed an adolescent girl forever, told by her grown-up self. As her friends challenge and cajole her and her family falls apart around her, she questions the core of her own humanity. The pathos and hubris of teenage years, the struggle for identity, independence, and authenticity, and the desire to find one's place in a complicated world — it all come rushing at us as she takes us on the ride of her life.