Farah Lawal Harris

Farah Lawal Harris

Farah Lawal Harris a first-generation Nigerian playwright, actress, and the Artistic Director of Young Playwrights' Theater in Washington, DC. She describes her writing style as "black girl magical realism" and her work has been performed in the Kennedy Center Page-to-Stage New Play Festival, the Capital Fringe Festival, Theater Alliance’s Hothouse New Play Development Series, Convergence Theatre...
Farah Lawal Harris a first-generation Nigerian playwright, actress, and the Artistic Director of Young Playwrights' Theater in Washington, DC. She describes her writing style as "black girl magical realism" and her work has been performed in the Kennedy Center Page-to-Stage New Play Festival, the Capital Fringe Festival, Theater Alliance’s Hothouse New Play Development Series, Convergence Theatre's Activist Arts Festival, and the DC Black Theatre Festival. Farah was a Founding Member of the Washington, DC-based theatre companies, The Saartjie Project and Wild Women Theatre and a three-time individual artist grant recipient from the DC Commission on the Arts and Humanities.

Farah deeply believes in the power of black women and their stories. She aims to empower and enlighten others through her art, which is her activism. Her work is personal, raw, poetic, funny, and focused on social justice.

Plays

  • America's Wives
    ONE-ACT: One Older Wife. One Younger Wife. One Bald Eagle. And Absent America. Inspired by a Nigerian Folktale, this poetic script explores identity, love and greed in today’s world. Delve into what it means to be faithful and moral to yourself and to others, in a time of tremendous change.
  • Black Girl, Black Pearl
    ONE-ACT: In this poetic, heart-wrenching, empowering drama, drawing on ancient Greek drama traditions, 25-year-old Danah was raped on her birthday. Seeking freedom and healing, she engages in a pattern of public nudity as The 'Round-the-Way Girls, a “Greek Chorus” of narrators and revolving supporting characters lead us through Danah’s journey to empowerment.
  • Rachel Resists
    ONE-ACT: This adaptation was inspired by the 1916 melodrama, Rachel, by Angelina Weld Grimké. Rachel was originally produced by the NAACP in 1916 in Washington, DC and is known to be the earliest surviving full-length play by a black woman.

    Rachel Resists imagines the same characters as they would be today if they lived in Washington, DC. Instead of dealing with lynching, the family battles the...
    ONE-ACT: This adaptation was inspired by the 1916 melodrama, Rachel, by Angelina Weld Grimké. Rachel was originally produced by the NAACP in 1916 in Washington, DC and is known to be the earliest surviving full-length play by a black woman.

    Rachel Resists imagines the same characters as they would be today if they lived in Washington, DC. Instead of dealing with lynching, the family battles the effects of police brutality, being constantly stimulated and traumatized by the media, poverty, as well as a woman’s right to choose.
  • We Used to Be Afraid
    10-MINUTE: Three cousins, fed up with the societal pressures and racism that come with being black women in America, change their destinies by casting a spell to become white.
  • Love Lives Here
    10-MINUTE: A lesbian couple discovers that violence could be a way to heal their wounds.