Amy Crider

Amy Crider

Amy Crider has been a semifinalist for the Princess Grace Award, the O'Neill, and Seven Devils. She has had 35 readings and small productions. Her BA in Theater is from Goddard College. She has been studying with Chicago Dramatists since 2010. In 2017 she produced her play Leda and donated 100% of the ticket proceeds to Mercy Corps, a charity that helps people in the direst need around the world.

Plays

  • The Hamster
    The biggest Trump election night party in 2016: The one at Vladimir Putin's house.
  • The New Deal
    A female DA copes with the case of a serial killer who runs for president from jail, while her teen-age daughter
    runs away to figure things out.
  • Metadata
    A young woman gets a new job working with a psychologist to study human behavior on social media. At first it's fun to see who likes and shares cute cat videos. But things take a dark turn when they're assigned to create a political action group whose members seem to be disappearing.
  • Civilization
    Maybe we'd all be happier in simpler times...like 9000 BC. A family finds out.
  • Fourteen
    Three freshman girls in high school befriend a robot who has joined their class, and the class bully is redeemed.
    Note: there is adult language.
  • Wells and Welles
    Two years after Orson Welles' famous War of the Worlds broadcast, he and HG Wells happened to be in Texas at the same time. Orson comes to HG's hotel room to ask a favor on a rainy night.
  • The Death of Captain Hero
    It's 1974, an animation studio in LA. When the lead voice actor of a Saturday morning cartoon show dies a scandalous death in a seedy motel, Chuck, the head writer, wants to give him a heroic send-off on the show. But it's against FCC regulation for a character to die on a Saturday morning cartoon (this is a real regulation). When he promises some school children an extra-special episode of the...
    It's 1974, an animation studio in LA. When the lead voice actor of a Saturday morning cartoon show dies a scandalous death in a seedy motel, Chuck, the head writer, wants to give him a heroic send-off on the show. But it's against FCC regulation for a character to die on a Saturday morning cartoon (this is a real regulation). When he promises some school children an extra-special episode of the show, they question him about what makes someone a hero. As he writes his final script, he struggles to answer, and cartoons come to life in his imagination. Note: There are 2 children in the cast, a boy and a girl. A woman character is Indian (from India), which is not a category listed here among the choices.
  • Charlie Johnson Reads All of Proust
    A full-length monologue. Charlie Johnson is a 75-year old small town Midwesterner. One day he dips a Madeleine cookie in his coffee at Starbucks, and his snooty daughter-in-law gives him a little lecture on Proust.
    Determined to prove he's no dummy, he decides to read all of Proust. He then reflects upon the epic and his own life, as he ponders how to "live right" and get close to his estranged daughter.
  • Locked Ward
    When a young nurse is found dead in a psych ward, the patients must hold themselves together to solve the mystery. A realistic view of psych wards based on personal experience.
  • The Sound
    Dom and Suzy have just moved into a new apartment, when an annoying sound coming in bothers Dom. The sound drives him to the edge of madness. Then he notices that when Suzy sits in a certain corner, the sound goes away. He'll do anything to keep her in that corner, even sell his soul. As Suzy stays ensconced in her corner, the play becomes increasingly surreal, as she turns into an object of worship and horror.
  • The Last Sane Man
    Casey is a shy, withdrawn college student who meets a young man with a theory: insanity is caused by a virus that's spreading around the globe. As she observes the crazy world around us, embodied by her news-obsessed grandmother, she starts to think he is right. But as Alan becomes more obsessed with his theory, Casey is forced to break out of her shell to be the friend he needs.
  • Poet and Warrior
    It's August, 1916. The famous Irish poet William Butler Yeats has come to Normandy to pace on the beach with the revolutionary Maud Gonne, considered Ireland's Joan of Arc. He has wanted to marry her for 30 years, and the Easter Uprising has just made her a widow. Can he convince her at last, or will he finally let her go?
  • Leda
    A farce in the style of Aristophanes. Leda is captured in the war between Athens and Sparta and sold into slavery. One day in the market, a soldier seduces her claiming to be Zeus in disguise, then goes off, leaving her pregnant. Her Master notices her condition and orders her to "expose" (abandon to die) the baby when it's born. She says she can't do this, because the baby's father...
    A farce in the style of Aristophanes. Leda is captured in the war between Athens and Sparta and sold into slavery. One day in the market, a soldier seduces her claiming to be Zeus in disguise, then goes off, leaving her pregnant. Her Master notices her condition and orders her to "expose" (abandon to die) the baby when it's born. She says she can't do this, because the baby's father is Zeus. The Mayor gets wind of this and thinks a child of Zeus born in Athens would be great publicity for his re-election, while the High Priest is terrified Hera will punish them and orders Leda into exile. Everyone is trying to control Leda's fate, but with the help of Socrates, Leda outwits all of Athens to gain her freedom and have a happy ending.
  • The Morrigan
    An adaptation of legends from ancient , pre-Christian Ireland. Many characters, good for a large drama department, with many strong female roles and a lot of stage combat.
  • Fading Away
    An old lesbian history professor is in conflict with her partner's daughter about how to handle her partner's dementia. (10 minute)