William J. Meyer

William J. Meyer

What do I like to write about? Psychological trauma, spiritual crisis, misplaced guilt, religious terror, environmental madness. And cosmic chaos! Sometimes robots.

My audio fiction has been chosen as a Platinum Selection of the HEAR Now Festival, a Showcase Selection of the PodTales Festival, Co-Winner of the Audio Verse Awards Writing of a New Spoken Word Production, and awarded Best...
What do I like to write about? Psychological trauma, spiritual crisis, misplaced guilt, religious terror, environmental madness. And cosmic chaos! Sometimes robots.

My audio fiction has been chosen as a Platinum Selection of the HEAR Now Festival, a Showcase Selection of the PodTales Festival, Co-Winner of the Audio Verse Awards Writing of a New Spoken Word Production, and awarded Best Speculative Fiction Story (Long Form) from the Parsec Awards.

My screenplays have placed in the Austin Film Festival and the ScreenCraft TV Pilot Screenwriting Competition.

I am currently writing and producing the anthology fiction podcast Strange/Love —stories of sci-fi, fantasy, and the macabre.

I'm from Wisconsin but now live in Los Angeles. I miss the snow but not the cold.

Plays

  • The Mutant Clock (15-Minute Play)
    Karter wishes to terminate Companion Association with the robot named Auden.
  • The Sound of Many Oceans
    Alex believes a micro-circuitry device has been attached to his body to reshape his brain and prevent him from hearing the sound of oceans. His friend and confidant Jules agrees to search his body.

    A thirty-page play.
  • The Sound of Many Oceans (Monologue)
    In this monologue from "The Sound of Many Oceans," Alex excitedly explains how we are all living vibrations.
  • Waiting to Die in a Tent, A Few Thoughts on Valhalla
    The old viking warrior Einarr and his young friend Mikel battle to protect their distant city of Reidun. When Einarr is mortally wounded, Mikel sets out to locate Einarr’s estranged daughter Kára for a final father-daughter reunion. But before they can return, a mysterious figure finds Einarr alone-- and about to breathe his last.
  • The Transposition of Chloë Brontë
    Chloë and Max’s relationship is strained when they move in together and Chloë’s sleep paralysis appears to open a portal to another dimension.
  • a wish for my forever -- a moon monologue
    This monologue is from the point of view of the moon.
    It is inspired by the giant impact hypothesis which states a mass named Theia collided with the Earth in the distant past to create the moon.
  • The Birthing Pit
    John and Castella flee a mysterious pestilence at the end of the American Revolutionary War, sailing home to Rhode Island from the Caribbean. But when the farmer Atabei kills their ship’s captain during what might be a supernatural storm, tragedy stalks all three.
  • The Birthing Pit (Monologues)
    Monologues from the full-length play The Birthing Pit.

    John and Castella flee a mysterious pestilence at the end of the American Revolutionary War, sailing home to Rhode Island from the Caribbean. But when the farmer Atabei kills their ship’s captain during what might be a supernatural storm, tragedy stalks all three.

    The pdf contains two monologues each for three separate...
    Monologues from the full-length play The Birthing Pit.

    John and Castella flee a mysterious pestilence at the end of the American Revolutionary War, sailing home to Rhode Island from the Caribbean. But when the farmer Atabei kills their ship’s captain during what might be a supernatural storm, tragedy stalks all three.

    The pdf contains two monologues each for three separate characters:
    Castella, a novelist from Rhode Island.
    John, a doctor from Rhode Island.
    Atabei, a farmer from Puerto Rico.
  • The Maimed King
    Joseph and Evelake arrive on the shores of England, planning to secret the Holy Grail inland to the town of Glastonbury. The brigand tracking them is the least of Evelake’s perils as he begins to doubt the foundation of his new Christian faith.
  • Idylls of Camelot
    Following the death of their parents, Cindy and Harry wrestle both with their tumultuous family history and their father’s weird invention.

    NOTE: This play contains themes of alcoholism, death, and suicide.