Tom Horan

Tom Horan

Tom Horan is a Writer and Sound Designer, who currently teaches at Earlham College and serves as Co-Artistic Director of the theater collective The Duplicates. His works have been honored with several awards, including Best-of-Fest at the Austin FronteraFest for THE KING AND THE CLOCKMAKER, an NNPN Showcase at the Kennedy Center for STATIC and two Austin Table Critics Awards for THE POISON SQUAD. Recently his...
Tom Horan is a Writer and Sound Designer, who currently teaches at Earlham College and serves as Co-Artistic Director of the theater collective The Duplicates. His works have been honored with several awards, including Best-of-Fest at the Austin FronteraFest for THE KING AND THE CLOCKMAKER, an NNPN Showcase at the Kennedy Center for STATIC and two Austin Table Critics Awards for THE POISON SQUAD. Recently his play, TYPHOID MARY, received development help from Stage West Theatre, The Lark Play Development, the 2014 NNPN Showcase and went on to premiere at The Phoenix Theater in Indianapolis. Tom serves as NNPN Playwright-in-Residence at the Phoenix, where he will be working on two productions this season: ACID DOLPHIN EXPERIMENT, a kaleidoscopic look at the life of John C. Lilly and LEYENDA, a collaborative creation with Bryan Fonseca based off Latino Folk Tales.

Plays

  • The Giantmaker
    The Giantmaker takes one of the most famous hoaxes in United States History and spins a larger than life theatrical tale. After an atheist, George Hull, gets into an argument with a Methodist preacher, he decides to get revenge. When an apparent 10ft tall petrified man is unearthed on a quiet farm in upstate New York, Mr. Hull hopes to trick the bible literalists who believe in giants into paying to see it, yet...
    The Giantmaker takes one of the most famous hoaxes in United States History and spins a larger than life theatrical tale. After an atheist, George Hull, gets into an argument with a Methodist preacher, he decides to get revenge. When an apparent 10ft tall petrified man is unearthed on a quiet farm in upstate New York, Mr. Hull hopes to trick the bible literalists who believe in giants into paying to see it, yet he fails to realize how this oddity will capture the imagination of the scientific community, the media and the American public.
  • Static
    When Emma was a little girl, she heard ghost stories about her neighbors Walter and Millie Burke - how the couple filled their home with strange things, which drove them mad. Years have passed and Emma finds herself the owner of this house that has sat abandoned for years. She discovers, among the jars of buttons and tubs of forks, a box full of cassette tapes filled with secrets of Walter and Millie. 

  • Mary Shelly
    During a rainy stretch of days, Mary Shelley creates what would become her most famous novel, Frankenstein. The play tackles this event with all due irreverence, coloring in margins of history books with its portrayal of husband Percy Shelly, step sister Claire, host Lord Byron and his Doctor. The play unearths a figurative understanding of creation, unsettling notions of God, Death, Art and Waldorf Salads –...
    During a rainy stretch of days, Mary Shelley creates what would become her most famous novel, Frankenstein. The play tackles this event with all due irreverence, coloring in margins of history books with its portrayal of husband Percy Shelly, step sister Claire, host Lord Byron and his Doctor. The play unearths a figurative understanding of creation, unsettling notions of God, Death, Art and Waldorf Salads – Mary believes the creature of her story is alive and responsible for all the real tragedies in her life.
  • Typhoid Mary
    The term “Typhoid Mary,” signifying a person who knowingly spreads disease, has become common place. Yet the tale of the Mary Mallon, the cook who inspired the name, is lesser known. In 1906, Dr. George Soper and Dr. Sara Baker discovered that Mary, a working-class immigrant, caused several breakouts of typhoid. They labeled her an “asymptomatic carrier” of Typhoid, a designation that medicine was still...
    The term “Typhoid Mary,” signifying a person who knowingly spreads disease, has become common place. Yet the tale of the Mary Mallon, the cook who inspired the name, is lesser known. In 1906, Dr. George Soper and Dr. Sara Baker discovered that Mary, a working-class immigrant, caused several breakouts of typhoid. They labeled her an “asymptomatic carrier” of Typhoid, a designation that medicine was still struggling to understand. With no trial, the medical authority locked Mary away for 3 years, then unceremoniously let go on the condition she not cook ever again. A few years later she was found cooking at the scene of a typhoid outbreak at a maternity hospital, forcing her into quarantine for the rest of her life. The play TYPHOID MARY, funnels the story through Mary’s persecuted eyes and the two very different doctors who sought to understand her condition. At heart, the play digs into the battle of a Religious versus Medical understanding of cleanliness and the people caught in the middle. Her discovery as well as her subsequent treatment by Dr. Soper and Dr. Baker, unfolds in front of a backdrop of changing understanding sickness and morality, which are complicated by notions of power, gender, and class.