Melissa Lucero McCarl

Melissa Lucero McCarl

Author of "Painted Bread," a full length play about the tumultuous life of Frida Kahlo voted "Best New Play" by the Denver Post. Commissioned by the Jewish Community Center to write "Poignant Irritations" about the life of Gertrude Stein ("Best New Play" and "Best Local Playwright" by Westword.) Commissioned by Bonnie Metzgar to write for "War Anthology...
Author of "Painted Bread," a full length play about the tumultuous life of Frida Kahlo voted "Best New Play" by the Denver Post. Commissioned by the Jewish Community Center to write "Poignant Irritations" about the life of Gertrude Stein ("Best New Play" and "Best Local Playwright" by Westword.) Commissioned by Bonnie Metzgar to write for "War Anthology" at Curious Theatre Company. Melissa's one act, "Carlene Yakkin'" is a recipient of the Steven Dietz award.

Plays

  • Crazy Patterns
    Marlo and Walt are an affable, affectionate couple. When lights come up they are in their kitchen engaging in playful banter, but there is an undercurrent of unrest in the atmosphere, which comes to light when Marlo’s twelve-year-old daughter Nicole appears. It is the feeling of a slow gas leak in the house – something is clearly not right. Slowly through out the play we get more hints about what happened to...
    Marlo and Walt are an affable, affectionate couple. When lights come up they are in their kitchen engaging in playful banter, but there is an undercurrent of unrest in the atmosphere, which comes to light when Marlo’s twelve-year-old daughter Nicole appears. It is the feeling of a slow gas leak in the house – something is clearly not right. Slowly through out the play we get more hints about what happened to Nicole and how it is affecting the family dynamic. One parent refuses to accept reality, the other is changed irrevocably by it. This full -length piece is to be performed without an intermission, and by the end of it we learn Nicole’s fate, yet questions remain and nothing about this controversial subject matter is simple or explicit.
  • Lost Creatures
    “Lost Creatures” follows the evening in May of 1978 when British theatre critic Kenneth Tynan met his long time cinematic idol Louise Brooks. He travels to her dingy little apartment in Rochester, NY where she has sequestered herself over many decades. He is there ostensibly to write a profile on Brooks for the New Yorker, but he discovers that they are kindred spirits, and in spite of an age gap of...
    “Lost Creatures” follows the evening in May of 1978 when British theatre critic Kenneth Tynan met his long time cinematic idol Louise Brooks. He travels to her dingy little apartment in Rochester, NY where she has sequestered herself over many decades. He is there ostensibly to write a profile on Brooks for the New Yorker, but he discovers that they are kindred spirits, and in spite of an age gap of twenty years, theirs becomes an unlikely love story discovered through a marathon dialogue about sex, philosophy, art, and criticism. There is also a silent third character, Lulu, (based on Louise's role in her most famous silent film "Pandora's Box") who drives the action of the play.
  • Carlene Yakkin'
    A honky tonk angel named Carlene tells us about the quirky trials and tribulations of living in a place like Truth or Consequences, New Mexico. A one act that can be done as a one woman or two person show.
  • Painted Bread
    “Painted Bread” is a play in two acts about the tumultuous life of Frida Kahlo and her marriage to Diego Rivera. In the tradition of magical realism, a series of paintings come to life to reveal the story in a non-linear fashion, changing time and place swiftly and with fluidity. In the seven- person cast, every actor with the exception of those portraying Frida and Diego play multiple roles. The set is...
    “Painted Bread” is a play in two acts about the tumultuous life of Frida Kahlo and her marriage to Diego Rivera. In the tradition of magical realism, a series of paintings come to life to reveal the story in a non-linear fashion, changing time and place swiftly and with fluidity. In the seven- person cast, every actor with the exception of those portraying Frida and Diego play multiple roles. The set is minimal, featuring picture frames that fly in and out, and a few generic set pieces (i.e. a bench, stool, etc.,) that are painted in the colorfully detailed Mexican style. Other than these multi-use set pieces, Frida is the most colorful thing on stage.