Meredith Bartmon

Meredith Bartmon

Meredith Bartmon is a South Florida based actress and dramaturg.

My dramaturgy has been utilized most recently by FIU's The Greenhouse.* Previous dramaturgy credits include the FAU Theatre Lab New Works Festival in Boca Raton, the Modern Works Festival at Urbanite Theatre (Sarasota), the New Year/New Play Festival and Young Playwrights Festival at Palm Beach Dramaworks (West Palm Beach),...
Meredith Bartmon is a South Florida based actress and dramaturg.

My dramaturgy has been utilized most recently by FIU's The Greenhouse.* Previous dramaturgy credits include the FAU Theatre Lab New Works Festival in Boca Raton, the Modern Works Festival at Urbanite Theatre (Sarasota), the New Year/New Play Festival and Young Playwrights Festival at Palm Beach Dramaworks (West Palm Beach), Young Playwrights Festival at Florida Stage (Manalapan), and various freelance clients.

*Due to Covid-19, more recent productions for which I provided, or was about to provide, dramaturgy have been postponed. Since the shutdown, I've provided freelance dramaturgical feedback for a few scripts in development, as well as volunteered as a writer, dramaturg, and actor for the Online Original Monologue Festival through FAU Theatre Lab.

I'm a proud member of Literary Managers and Dramaturgs of America, Actors Equity Association, and UK Equity. I obtained an MA in Acting from East 15 Acting School in London and a BFA in Music Theatre from New World School of the Arts in Miami. I participated in the American Theatre Wing’s college-to-career intensive, SpringboardNYC, in Manhattan in the summer of 2008.

All recommendations on this page are plays for which I have provided dramaturgy.

Recommended by Meredith Bartmon

  • Paint Night
    19 Mar. 2020
    Paint Night is a hilarious and beautifully woven story about how women support each other (or fail to) in an unpredictable world. The depth of each woman's pain is rendered in an uproarious and messily human night of drinking and painting. Crim has illustrated how life, family and friendship go on despite the terrifying encroachment of outside ills and uncertain times.
  • The Last Broadcast
    6 Mar. 2020
    The Last Broadcast is an engrossing family drama with a mysterious secret. Carey Crim’s characteristically artful economy of dialogue and patient pacing shines. By portraying a family that must learn to love one another in spite of sharp faults and mistakes, Crim invites the audience to remember the compassion of honesty in a harsh world. I was left with this thought; humans can attempt to deny their nightmares but the specter of trauma will haunt you until you find the courage to let the memory into the light.
  • With
    14 Oct. 2019
    With is a deeply affecting struggle against the inevitable surprise of death. At first, the audience laughs their way through the amusingly mundane problems of old age. As the play proceeds, we notice the character’s lives have become terrifying whirlpools of repetition. At what point do we actually die, when our hearts stop or when we stop engaging with our humanity? Minnie and Clifford are desperately trying to control death, to outsmart him. But the winter of our lives will come, the cold will win out, the story will go silent whether or not we bid it quiet.
  • Regular
    14 Oct. 2019
    Marjorie Muller mines story from meticulously detailed and compassionately crafted characters. In Regular, Muller focuses the narrative intimately on the people. In the relationships Kate develops with Josie, Eric, Angela and PJ, Muller has artfully given the audience permission to measure a life in steady satisfaction rather than extraordinary suffering. The thorough and funny dialogue beautifully renders a woman learning permission to define her own joy. Through the window of Kate’s passing seasons, from the hard frost of her past to her blooming sense of belonging, the audience also feels renewed.
  • Daisy Violet the Bitch Beast King
    14 Oct. 2019
    Sam Collier writes about women and girls living outside the restrictions of society by transcending human limitations. In Daisy Violet, three sisters reject what society perversely prescribes as feminine morality by joyfully subverting what makes a hero and what makes a Bitch. Through absurdism, allegory, feminism, and meter, Collier celebrates the persistence of women and the optimism of children in an existentially ridiculous time. How does a girl take revenge on the world? What do we lose when we become adults? And in the real world can we survive, like Daisy and her sisters, through fury, imagination, camaraderie and joy?