Mando Alvarado

Mando Alvarado

MANDO ALVARADO (Playwright) is an award-winning playwright/screenwriter from South Texas. His play Basilica premiered Off-Broadway at the famous Cherry Lane Theater in NYC. His play Post No Bills received its Off-Broadway premiere at Rattlestick Playwright's Theater. His new play, Diablo Love, had its world premiere this summer at Central Park's Summer Stages. They also produced A King of Infinite...
MANDO ALVARADO (Playwright) is an award-winning playwright/screenwriter from South Texas. His play Basilica premiered Off-Broadway at the famous Cherry Lane Theater in NYC. His play Post No Bills received its Off-Broadway premiere at Rattlestick Playwright's Theater. His new play, Diablo Love, had its world premiere this summer at Central Park's Summer Stages. They also produced A King of Infinite Space, a Hamlet/Pearl Jam mash-up and Sangre, an adaptation of Blood Wedding. He also co-wrote the book for the bilingual musical A Yellow Brick Road, an adaptation of Wizard of Oz for Theaterworks USA which received its critically acclaimed Off-Broadway premiere at The Lortel. His short play, Up the 405, premiered as a part of LA Views for Company of Angels in Los Angeles. His play Splitting Mama was selected to participate at the Black Swan Lab at Oregon Shakespeare Festival. He is a contributing writer for Theater 167’sYou Are Now the Owner of This Suitcase. He also participated in the Freight Project where he developed his play (On THE 5:31 which was commissioned for Rising Phoenix Rep's Cino Nights at the Seventh Street Small Stage. His play, Rear Exit, was presented at INTAR’s NewWorks Lab in an evening of shorts entitled ONE NIGHT IN THE VALLEY and was presented as a part of The Atlantic Theater’s Latino Theater Festival. His translation of Yamaha 300 for The Lark’s Mexico/US Exchange Program received a staged reading at The Goodman’s Latino Theater Festival. His play Throat was developed at The Field ArtWard Bound Residency Program and was produced by Allison Prouty at the 45th St Theater. Throat completed a three-city tour to Washington, DC, McAllen, TX, and Minneapolis, MN; it had an additional run at INTAR’s NewWorks Lab. His first feature film, Cruzando, which he co-wrote and co-directed with Michael Ray Escamilla is available on DVD and was distributed by Vanguard Cinema. He is a member of Rising Phoenix Rep, alum of INTAR’s Hispanic-Playwright-in-Residence Laboratory 2006 – 2008, a member of Company of Angels writer's group, and a graduate of The University of North Carolina School of the Arts. He's currently working on “Tyrant” for FX.

Plays

  • Living and Breathing...
    Living and Breathing is a hilarious and incendiary conversation about race, friendship and art in Trump’s America. Todd has bought a living sculpture and Michael is completely offended by the purchase. He cannot believe his best friend would ever do something like that. Their other friend, Jeremy is offended as well but he also finds value in the living sculpture and refuses to pick a side. This living and...
    Living and Breathing is a hilarious and incendiary conversation about race, friendship and art in Trump’s America. Todd has bought a living sculpture and Michael is completely offended by the purchase. He cannot believe his best friend would ever do something like that. Their other friend, Jeremy is offended as well but he also finds value in the living sculpture and refuses to pick a side. This living and breathing thing will cause a rift in a long term friendship that must evolve or come to an end.
  • Sangre
    Men will do what men will do. Bronx. A double homicide.
    In a graphic novel backdrop, Detective G must untangle this love triangle in order to find out what really happened between lovers and their bonds made in blood.

  • (o)N the 5:31
    On the 5:31 travels back and forth across the ten-year span of a relationship. After discovering his late wife's infidelity, a grieving Benny tries to piece back together the fragments of his marriage and come to terms with his own indiscretions and failures in the marriage.
  • Basilica
    In South Texas, two things loom large, The Catholic Church and Texas Pride... and Joe Garza - a strong, hard working man - embodies one more than the other. But when he learns that Gilbert Gonzalez has returned as the new pastor at the Basilica, Joe's confronted with the choices he made in life and questions the past the only way he knows how -- anger, pride and a biting tongue.

    "Mr....
    In South Texas, two things loom large, The Catholic Church and Texas Pride... and Joe Garza - a strong, hard working man - embodies one more than the other. But when he learns that Gilbert Gonzalez has returned as the new pastor at the Basilica, Joe's confronted with the choices he made in life and questions the past the only way he knows how -- anger, pride and a biting tongue.

    "Mr. Alvarado’s larger subject is San Juan itself, and the ways a small town both defines and destroys its inhabitants. The play, though set in the present, also exists out of time." New York Times

    "It is a pleasure to see a play in New York that grapples with weighty religious and philosophical questions, and in a manner not abstruse but personal." FT.com
  • Post No Bills
    Fleeing the Texas border town she grew up in, Reyna arrives in the big city, with nothing but her dream of becoming a singer/songwriter. Taking up with a pair of street musicians, she discovers that love is violent, friendship is pain and the true music comes from the depths of your soul.

    "Mr. Alvarado’s best touch is the way he suggests a father-daughter dynamic without ever letting you...
    Fleeing the Texas border town she grew up in, Reyna arrives in the big city, with nothing but her dream of becoming a singer/songwriter. Taking up with a pair of street musicians, she discovers that love is violent, friendship is pain and the true music comes from the depths of your soul.

    "Mr. Alvarado’s best touch is the way he suggests a father-daughter dynamic without ever letting you stop wondering if there’s a sexual undercurrent as well." New York Times

    "The unrequited love between Reyna and Esteban, who is old enough to be her father, is moving, and so is the ensemble." The New Yorker

    "...his characters ring achingly real, and the relationship between Esteban and Reyna is developed with an intriguing complexity." New York Post

    "The story's familiar, but just when it seems as though the piece might be settling into a conventional plot line or succumbing to sentimentality, Alvarado manages to throw in a welcome twist. Sometimes it's a song (the original tunes are from Sandra Rubio) that both fits the action and comments on it. At other moments, it's a bit of surprising lyricism, which offsets the characters' frequent bursts of Mamet-like invective, or a character behaving in an unexpected, yet psychologically believable, way." Theatermania

    "...what grounds this play and prevents it from ever veering into cliche is a superb command of specificity. His characters seem wonderfully authentic and fully realized, seasoned with detail. These are not caricatures, plucked from the Mexican border and dropped beneath Times Square, but real people with whom audiences may empathize. Their dialogue is sharp and knowing, another feather in Alvarado's cap." NYTheater.com