Zachariah Ezer

Zachariah Ezer

Zachariah Ezer is a Brooklyn-based dramatist. His work is chiefly concerned with identity and the myriad challenges that its assertion presents in the modern world. Onstage, his goal is to represent the struggles of all marginalized people with nuance and dignity. Selected plays include The Sprinkler (The National Black Theatre, The Workshop Theatre), The Stones of Life (Commission from American Lore Theater),...
Zachariah Ezer is a Brooklyn-based dramatist. His work is chiefly concerned with identity and the myriad challenges that its assertion presents in the modern world. Onstage, his goal is to represent the struggles of all marginalized people with nuance and dignity. Selected plays include The Sprinkler (The National Black Theatre, The Workshop Theatre), The Stones of Life (Commission from American Lore Theater), Time to A Phantom (Fade to Black Play Festival, Act One: One Act Festival, DC Black Theatre Festival, Best Play at the Woodside Players of Queens Summer Play Festival), Black Prometheus (Ruthless Nightingale's Nightingale Songs Festival, BUFU EYEDREAM Residency), and patience chaos ego bliss (Merde). Zachariah is a member of The Tank’s writers group--The LIT Council--, a member of the Dramatists Guild, and a graduate of Wesleyan University, where he was awarded Honors in General Scholarship and the Olin Fellowship for his thesis play, “Aporia!”

Plays

  • The Sprinkler
    Lamar hasn't been home in days; Alex can't stop getting into fights by the reservoir, and Kate is seeing an unlicensed Christian therapist. The trio only has a few months of high school left before they go to college Up North, but if their conservative, suburban town doesn’t destroy their futures, the games of control they play with each other just might.
  • Time to A Phantom
    Kyle's apartment is haunted, so he calls his super.
  • Black Prometheus
    Stuck in a negative experience machine, a pair of Black test subjects do everything they can to theorize a way out of being killed over and over again.

Recommended by Zachariah Ezer

  • Generation (Laz)Y
    15 May. 2019
    A dizzying, Ritalin-fueled satire that takes careful aim at our current age of precarity without sacrificing an ounce of heart. Read this play today, before you get too old to remember what the struggle was like.