Zachariah Ezer

Zachariah Ezer

Zachariah Ezer is a Brooklyn-based dramatist. His work is chiefly concerned with identity and the myriad challenges that its assertion presents in the modern world. Onstage, his goal is to represent the struggles of all marginalized people with nuance and dignity. Selected plays include The Sprinkler, or Why I Hate James Baldwin (National Black Theatre, Workshop Theatre), The Stones of Life (Commission from the...
Zachariah Ezer is a Brooklyn-based dramatist. His work is chiefly concerned with identity and the myriad challenges that its assertion presents in the modern world. Onstage, his goal is to represent the struggles of all marginalized people with nuance and dignity. Selected plays include The Sprinkler, or Why I Hate James Baldwin (National Black Theatre, Workshop Theatre), The Stones of Life (Commission from the American Lore Theater), Time to A Phantom (Fade to Black Festival, DC Black Theatre Festival, Best Play at the Woodside Players of Queens Summer Play Festival), Black Prometheus (Ruthless Nightingale's Nightingale Songs Festival, BUFU EYEDREAM Residency), and patience chaos ego bliss (Merde). Zachariah is a member of The Tank’s writers group--The LIT Council--, a member of the Dramatists Guild, and a graduate of Wesleyan University, where he was awarded Honors in General Scholarship and the Olin Fellowship for his thesis play, “Aporia!”

Plays

  • Time to A Phantom
    Kyle's apartment is haunted, so he calls his super.
  • Black Prometheus
    "Black Prometheus" is five vignettes about Black fungibility in America. In each, a particular Black
    Prometheus brings fire to the world and has their liver torn apart for it. This repeats ad infinitum.
    Until it doesn't.
  • The Sprinkler, or Why I Hate James Baldwin
    "The Sprinkler, or Why I Hate James Baldwin" is a coming-of-age story about two boys, one Black and one Asian, who learn to let go of themselves and grab onto each other against the sweaty backdrop of their last Texas summer before college.

Recommended by Zachariah Ezer

  • Generation (Laz)Y
    15 May. 2019
    A dizzying, Ritalin-fueled satire that takes careful aim at our current age of precarity without sacrificing an ounce of heart. Read this play today, before you get too old to remember what the struggle was like.