Zachariah Ezer

Zachariah Ezer

Zachariah Ezer is a Brooklyn-based dramatist. His work is chiefly concerned with identity and the myriad challenges that its assertion presents in the modern world. Onstage, his goal is to represent the struggles of all marginalized people with nuance and dignity. His latest play, “Time to A Phantom”, was selected for the Fade to Black Festival, the DC Black Theatre Festival, and The Woodside Players of Queens...
Zachariah Ezer is a Brooklyn-based dramatist. His work is chiefly concerned with identity and the myriad challenges that its assertion presents in the modern world. Onstage, his goal is to represent the struggles of all marginalized people with nuance and dignity. His latest play, “Time to A Phantom”, was selected for the Fade to Black Festival, the DC Black Theatre Festival, and The Woodside Players of Queens Summer Play Festival. His first play, “Black Prometheus”, was performed at the Ruthless Nightingale’s Nightingale Songs Festival and at the culmination of his BUFU EYEDREAM residency. His interdisciplinary piece, “patience chaos ego bliss”, premiered its first episode at Merde. Zachariah is also a LIT Council Finalist, Letter of Marque Ensemble Playwright Lab Finalist, an EST Marathon of One-Act Plays Semi-Finalist, and a BRIClab Semi-Finalist. Zachariah is an alumnus of Ars Nova's Emerging Leaders Group and a graduate of Wesleyan University, where he was awarded Honors in General Scholarship and the Olin Fellowship for his thesis play, “Aporia!”

Plays

  • Time to A Phantom
    Kyle's apartment is haunted, so he calls his super.
  • Black Prometheus
    "Black Prometheus" is five vignettes about black fungibility in America. In each, a particular Black
    Prometheus brings fire to the world and has their liver torn apart for it. This repeats ad infinitum.
    Until it doesn't.

Recommended by Zachariah Ezer

  • Generation (Laz)Y
    15 May. 2019
    A dizzying, Ritalin-fueled satire that takes careful aim at our current age of precarity without sacrificing an ounce of heart. Read this play today, before you get too old to remember what the struggle was like.