Eric Coble

Eric Coble

Eric Coble was born in Edinburgh, Scotland and raised on the Navajo and Ute reservations in New Mexico and Colorado. He is widely considered to be one of the tallest playwrights in America. His play “The Velocity of Autumn” premiered on Broadway at the Booth Theatre directed by Molly Smith, starring Estelle Parsons and Stephen Spinella.  Other scripts include “Bright Ideas”, “Southern Rapture”, “Fairfield”, “...
Eric Coble was born in Edinburgh, Scotland and raised on the Navajo and Ute reservations in New Mexico and Colorado. He is widely considered to be one of the tallest playwrights in America. His play “The Velocity of Autumn” premiered on Broadway at the Booth Theatre directed by Molly Smith, starring Estelle Parsons and Stephen Spinella.  Other scripts include “Bright Ideas”, “Southern Rapture”, “Fairfield”, “A Girl’s Guide to Coffee”, "My Barking Dog" and “The Giver” and have been produced Off-Broadway, in all fifty states of the U.S., and on several continents, including productions at Manhattan Class Company, The Kennedy Center, Actors Theatre of Louisville Humana Festival, Denver Center Theatre Company, Arena Stage, New York and Edinburgh Fringe Festivals, Cleveland Play House, South Coast Repertory, New Theatre, Cleveland Public Theatre, Curious Theatre, Boise Contemporary Theatre, Southern Rep, and The Contemporary American Theatre Festival. Awards include the AATE Distinguished Play Award for Best Adaptation, an Emmy nomination, the Edgerton Award for New American Plays, the Chorpenning Playwriting Award for Body of Work, the AT&T Onstage Award, National Theatre Conference Playwriting Award, the Cleveland Arts Prize, and two Cuyahoga Arts and Culture Fellowships.

Plays

  • A Girl's Guide To Coffee
    "People disappear, the image in the cup disappears, you can’t ever fully put your weight on anything or anyone, atoms rearrange, nothing is constant... and the best you can hope for is to achieve a moment of perfection -- a perfect latte maybe... and then disappear." All of life’s mysteries will be revealed in the Steamed Bean Coffee House, at the hands of barista extraordinaire Alex. She is the...
    "People disappear, the image in the cup disappears, you can’t ever fully put your weight on anything or anyone, atoms rearrange, nothing is constant... and the best you can hope for is to achieve a moment of perfection -- a perfect latte maybe... and then disappear." All of life’s mysteries will be revealed in the Steamed Bean Coffee House, at the hands of barista extraordinaire Alex. She is the master of her mellowing parents, tensing roommates, imploding bosses, and desperate regulars. But what no one but Alex seems to get is that our jobs, our world itself – nothing is constant. And if it’s all moving at the speed of espresso steam, what is there to commit to? The trick is to just touch perfection… and move on. Except… there is this boy… silver artist Christopher... who may, just may, be worth a “yes” instead of a “maybe”… but what would that do to the delicate ecosystem of the coffee shop? Not to mention Alex’s quest for the holy grail of dark roast… The Perfect Latte… “Wincingly funny, playwright Eric Coble pours a cup of youthful freedom in ‘A Girl’s Guide to Coffee’... It's a testament to Coble that the things Alex says sound like the caffeinated musings of a flesh-and-blood twentysomething, not a sitcom parody of a hipster spouting post- grad speak…” ​-- Cleveland Plain Dealer “A delightful evening of theatre... Coble has the ability to take a minor incident and translate it into an amusing, yet meaningful theatrical experience.” -- CoolCleveland.com “Both tender and achingly funny, what makes Coble’s play more than a steady stream of laughs is its piercing honesty. “ ​-- Cleveland Jewish News “A charming new hit... Coble turns the coffee-shop atmosphere into a philosophy of life” -- West Side Leader “The furious, funny work is an insightful cutting criticism of our consumerist, text-addicted age” ​-- Cleveland.com “Coble uses coffee as a skillfully brewed metaphor in this smart, funny, and poetically written comedy” ​-- The Akron Beacon Journal
  • My Barking Dog
    "And the question is: Are the coyotes the last dregs of a wild we are inevitably surrounding... or are they the first scouts of a wild that is inevitably surrounding us?" Toby and Melinda live quiet lonely lives in their apartment building. Until the night when a starving coyote shows up on their fire escape. From here their world spirals magically, wildly out of control as they embrace their...
    "And the question is: Are the coyotes the last dregs of a wild we are inevitably surrounding... or are they the first scouts of a wild that is inevitably surrounding us?" Toby and Melinda live quiet lonely lives in their apartment building. Until the night when a starving coyote shows up on their fire escape. From here their world spirals magically, wildly out of control as they embrace their animal instincts - every night bonding deeper with their untamed visitor. By turns highly poetic, disturbing, and dangerous, "My Barking Dog" is a riotous, riveting exploration of the lengths to which our everyday lives have disconnected us from nature, and what happens when the boundaries between wild and civilized are gnawed clean through. “GO! At various moments poetic, funny, gripping and stomach-churning, and sometimes all these things together.” --L.A. Weekly “An intense, captivating, and improbably funny 90-minute piece…" -- The Plain Dealer “For nimble minds seeking a more cerebrally challenging alternative to the commercialized platitudes that tend to crop up around Earth Day, ‘My Barking Dog’ could be just the ticket.” -- Los Angeles Times “The edgy magical realism is darkly comic, disturbingly funny, and haunting” -- Cleveland Magazine “Smart, witty, theatre of the absurb-esque... A stream-lined, no-fat depiction of two lonely souls possibly finding their ultimate purpose in life.” -- BroadwayWorld.com “A great new American play... a boldly imaginative theater piece that is strange and startling as well as humorous and oddly touching.” -- Cleveland Jewish News “This is a truly magnificent piece of work... as funny as it is thought-provoking, and as imaginative as it is relevant" -- The News-Herald “Leave your expectations at home. ...Truly, Fantastic.” --On Stage Los Angeles “Gets under your skin to resonate both thematically and dramatically” --Stage Raw
  • Fairfield
    "The point of this month is not belief, it’s skin color! Or rather it’s that skin color doesn’t matter, we’re all human, we’re all wonderful. It’s about ignoring skin color. By pointing it out. And celebrating it. Then moving beyond it. In March." Fairfield Elementary is a progressive integrated school in a progressive integrated community where Black History Month goes horribly horribly wrong...
    "The point of this month is not belief, it’s skin color! Or rather it’s that skin color doesn’t matter, we’re all human, we’re all wonderful. It’s about ignoring skin color. By pointing it out. And celebrating it. Then moving beyond it. In March." Fairfield Elementary is a progressive integrated school in a progressive integrated community where Black History Month goes horribly horribly wrong. One bad role-playing exercise by an over-eager 1st grade teacher and suddenly black and white parents, principals, superintendents, and teachers are fighting for their educational lives and to just reach the "CelebrEthnic Potluck" on February 28th in one piece. “‘Fairfield’ is absolutely not to be missed... the script is a laugh riot” -- BroadwayWorld.com “An absolute scream... The crowd howled at the dexterity and audacity of Coble's jewel of a script” --Cleveland Plain Dealer 
“‘Fairfield is big and bold, full of great one-liners and deep thoughts, but is not for the easily offended” -- The Examiner “This terrific, funny play is sure to become a hit in regional theatres across the country” -- Talkin’ Broadway “Superb with razor sharp comedic timing" -- AXS “Coble's show is filled with both witty and guffaw-producing dialogue" -- Westlife “A hilarious and increasingly outrageous exploration of the current state of race relations in America” --Cleveland Jewish News “Piercing and insightful social commentary... A wickedly witty comedy of manners mixed with slapstick farce” -- Scene Magazine
  • Stranded On Earth
    "In retrospect, I think our bed frame might have been the beginning of the end. It seems possible, doesn’t it, that you can tell life’s journey by how portable your bed is?" Alexa is a brilliant visual artist. Or she was. Now she works on ads for Panda Buffet and futon stores. While also juggling her children, husband, parents. And what may or may not be the end of Earth's atmosphere. But...
    "In retrospect, I think our bed frame might have been the beginning of the end. It seems possible, doesn’t it, that you can tell life’s journey by how portable your bed is?" Alexa is a brilliant visual artist. Or she was. Now she works on ads for Panda Buffet and futon stores. While also juggling her children, husband, parents. And what may or may not be the end of Earth's atmosphere. But all that was Before. Now she's circling in on what's changed, what she's lost and whether her art can once more save her and just possibly all of humanity. Stranded On Earth is a poetic labyrinth of a monologue about the cost of putting down roots and the cost of exploding free. “A lyrically beautiful, sensitive drama” -- Rochester Democrat and Chronicle “Deep and poetic... Not only uplifting, but thrilling” -- Artes Magazine "Sublime... Coble's marvelously evocative script uses its gorgeous language to paint the air with pictures. -- Cleveland Plain Dealer “Mesmerizing.... A deep, fascinating world for the audience to explore” -- Broadwayworld.com “Coble fuses together originality and imagination in such an effective, brilliant and absolutely captivating way it will take your breath away.” --Boise Highlights “ ****. One minute the audience is laughing, the other gasping ....Thoughtful, Funny, Intense and Jarring.” --Fine Arts Examiner “Coble can craft sentences that bristle and heave with such lush imagery that you just want to take a few and cuddle up with them over a glass of brandy.” --Scene Magazine