Ginna Hoben

Ginna Hoben

Ginna Hoben is a New York based actor/playwright. Her solo play "The Twelve Dates of Christmas" has enjoyed over fifty productions nation and worldwide. Other produced plays include "No Spring Chicken", (D.C.’s Women’s Voices Theatre Festival); "pierced!" (New York and Edinburgh Fringe Festivals); "the wind-chill factor" and the ten-minute plays "telephone" (...
Ginna Hoben is a New York based actor/playwright. Her solo play "The Twelve Dates of Christmas" has enjoyed over fifty productions nation and worldwide. Other produced plays include "No Spring Chicken", (D.C.’s Women’s Voices Theatre Festival); "pierced!" (New York and Edinburgh Fringe Festivals); "the wind-chill factor" and the ten-minute plays "telephone" (The Actors Theatre of Louisville) and "Spit Spat Splendor" Spite (from “Shakespeare in Mind”, Dramatic Publishing.) She has also been a writer/producer for the Emmy nominated TV show Brain Games.

Ginna has performed at various American regional theatres, most notably, in 31 productions at The American Shakespeare Center.

She is currently an artist-fellow of the Hermitage Artist Retreat, a yoga and fitness instructor, a wife, and the mother of a five-year old daughter.

Plays

  • The Twelve Dates of Christmas
    On Thanksgiving Day, Mary discovers that her fiancé is cheating on her when she catches him on national TV kissing another woman at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade. She then must navigate a year's worth of hapless holidays and luckless romances amid the colorful characters that make up her family. Christmas, New Year's Eve, and St. Patrick's Day bring one dating disaster after another....
    On Thanksgiving Day, Mary discovers that her fiancé is cheating on her when she catches him on national TV kissing another woman at the Macy's Thanksgiving Day parade. She then must navigate a year's worth of hapless holidays and luckless romances amid the colorful characters that make up her family. Christmas, New Year's Eve, and St. Patrick's Day bring one dating disaster after another. June provides a “wedding season” of letdowns, and Halloween is nothing less than a horror show. When the second Christmas rolls around, a surprise encounter with a five-year-old boy whom she has come to adore changes her mood, her day, and her whole perspective.
  • Lady Balthasar
    Lady Balthasar is a raucous comedy that explores the meeting of several Shakespearean characters (three of whom are named Balthasar) in search of legal expertise from Portia (The Merchant of Venice), who is disguised as a young male attorney, also named "Balthasar." The play reimagines Portia and Nerissa on their journey to defend Antonio against Shylock, and how the events at the trial affect and...
    Lady Balthasar is a raucous comedy that explores the meeting of several Shakespearean characters (three of whom are named Balthasar) in search of legal expertise from Portia (The Merchant of Venice), who is disguised as a young male attorney, also named "Balthasar." The play reimagines Portia and Nerissa on their journey to defend Antonio against Shylock, and how the events at the trial affect and change them. When they stop at Dick (the Butcher)'s Tavern, their path intersects with Vi (Viola) and Ros (Rosalind) who have veered out of their respective Shakespearean plots in hopes of a better future together. In a collision of Shakespearean characters: men vs. women; upper class vs. servant class; and the “britches” characters who disguise themselves to weave in and out of two worlds, Lady Balthasar explores biases based on religion, gender, class, and sexual identity.

    The language in Balthasar/She/Her/Hers pays homage to Shakespeare’s use of rhetorical devices, wordplay, and –in a few instances– iambic pentameter. Its plot dances around and occasionally partners with Shakespeare’s plots, but finds a resolution all its own.
  • No Spring Chicken
    All she wants is a baby! “No Spring Chicken” is a heartfelt comedy about one woman’s effort to achieve, survive, and (without medication) complete pregnancy at 40. “Hoben’s edgy sense of humor weaves the play’s contrasting elements — hilarity, raw emotion, graphic detail, darker fears — into a consistent whole.” (Washington Post)