Julius Galacki

Julius Galacki

Julius Galacki is a Playwriting graduate of the Yale School of Drama. He is also a graduate of NYU holding both a M.A. from the interdisciplinary Gallatin School and a B.F.A. from the Tisch School of Arts.

His short plays have been produced OOB, at the Electric Lodge, the Hothouse, the Hollywood Fringe Festival in Los Angeles, and the Yale Cabaret and full length and short plays have been read...
Julius Galacki is a Playwriting graduate of the Yale School of Drama. He is also a graduate of NYU holding both a M.A. from the interdisciplinary Gallatin School and a B.F.A. from the Tisch School of Arts.

His short plays have been produced OOB, at the Electric Lodge, the Hothouse, the Hollywood Fringe Festival in Los Angeles, and the Yale Cabaret and full length and short plays have been read in NYC, LA, Philadelphia, NJ, Hawaii and South Carolina.

His 29 minute film “ALL THINGS CHICKEN” which he directed, produced and adapted from the play of the same name, has been selected by the following 2015 film festivals: ReelHeart (Toronto), 300 Minutes (Karlsruhe, Germany), Green Bay, Colombia River Gorge, and Tenerife (Madrid). Of the latter, it has also been nominated for Best Short Film, Best Short Screenplay, Best Producer of a Short, Best Lead Actor and Best Supporting Actor in a Short. www.allthingschickenthemovie.com

His first short film "FIRST NIGHT", based on the short play of the same name, was shown at the 2010 Ventura and Flagstaff Film Festivals, the 2012 Hollywood Fringe Festival, was nominated in 2012 for Best Short Film by Stay Tuned TV website and was broadcast on Palm Springs PBS-KVCR on 1/12/13 during the Shorts Showcase program. The film can now be viewed on the web on Funny or Die, where it's had over 32,000 hits, YouTube or in hi-def at http://vimeo.com/35941900

His monologues appear in all four volumes of the series “Audition Arsenal” published by Smith & Kraus.

Plays

  • Black Flamingos
    The play is a darkly humorous, poetic drama that goes on a metaphysical journey in which one heroine drives her car headlong into the mouth of a laughing god, but simultaneously also travels from fury to forgiveness.

    In act one, Cecilia, the self-proclaimed “patron saint of the sun-baked, warped cassette tape,” never stops driving. Passing through the emptiness of the Utah Salt Flats with a...
    The play is a darkly humorous, poetic drama that goes on a metaphysical journey in which one heroine drives her car headlong into the mouth of a laughing god, but simultaneously also travels from fury to forgiveness.

    In act one, Cecilia, the self-proclaimed “patron saint of the sun-baked, warped cassette tape,” never stops driving. Passing through the emptiness of the Utah Salt Flats with a hitchhiker named Jake, she stops and heads off on foot into the desert. Jake, initially under the misconception that this jaunt into the desert will lead to a sexual encounter, follows her, but instead he undergoes a test of his worthiness – in a confrontation with a crazy hermit/demon. If Jake passes the test, Cecilia wants him to accompany her on her quest to find god and “give the world some sleep.”

    The second act begins with the same actors of Act 1 playing completely different characters, but it slowly becomes clear that two of the characters are doppelgangers to two of the characters in Act 1: Tobias is fleeing a bad divorce, taking his ocean-going boat to Kansas . His car mysteriously breaks down at an abandoned gas station just east of the Salt Flats. He ends up tied to a rock in the sun. His only hope for survival is the strange child-woman Ev, whom he must convince to free him before Isaac, her demon-keeper, returns with a good sack of additions for the “stew”.

    At the end of Act 2, the stories from both acts as well as the doppelganger characters integrate into a new wholeness – where love is once again possible.
  • The Master and the Magician
    “The Master and the Magician,” is a romp, a farce, a hotchpot of mistaken identity, physical buffoonery, vulgarity, rhymed couplets, alliterations and word play (e.g. “I must snare this hare before she becomes rabidly aware.”): a fractured fairy tale for adults culminates in an increasingly frenetic, farcical series of reversals.

    To this end, the language of the play initially is straightforward...
    “The Master and the Magician,” is a romp, a farce, a hotchpot of mistaken identity, physical buffoonery, vulgarity, rhymed couplets, alliterations and word play (e.g. “I must snare this hare before she becomes rabidly aware.”): a fractured fairy tale for adults culminates in an increasingly frenetic, farcical series of reversals.

    To this end, the language of the play initially is straightforward and fairly naturalistic, but as the realm of magic becomes the locale of the action, the words also become more heightened and overtly poetic and playful (e.g. “I must snare this hare before she becomes rabidly aware.”). Yet beneath this seemingly light entertainment is a contemplation of class, gender roles, the nature of love and mortality itself.

    Class is built into the very vocabulary of the characters as the noble Lovers employ a greater proportion of French derived words; the peasant Lovers use more Anglo-Saxon based words and the magical characters utilize Latinate words. The play uses the conventions and clichés of its faux medieval world (romantic love, divine right of kings, etc.) to both subvert those conventions in not only the world of the play, but more importantly, our own modern world.