Andrea Markowitz

Andrea Markowitz

Award-winning playwright Andrea Markowitz became hooked on theatre at age seven, when she saw her first Broadway show. She earned degrees in English literature, musicology and psychology, and landed jobs in advertising, human resources, academia, and freelance writing and editing before authoring her first play. Andrea is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America, the International Centre for Women...
Award-winning playwright Andrea Markowitz became hooked on theatre at age seven, when she saw her first Broadway show. She earned degrees in English literature, musicology and psychology, and landed jobs in advertising, human resources, academia, and freelance writing and editing before authoring her first play. Andrea is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America, the International Centre for Women Playwrights, The Playwrights' Center, Southwest Shakespeare Company, ASCAP and Maestra. She is playwright in residence at Desert Foothills Theater, Scottsdale, AZ.

Plays

  • Aphrah-Cadabra
    NEW! SEEKING DEVELOPMENT PARTNER: A mysterious stranger shows up at the Jacobs' Passover Seder and sets into motion a series of extraordinary events that reconcile the family's clashing views about refugees, religion and responsibility. Is it divine intervention, or reality TV?
  • Dancing on Ice
    A near-death experience heals deep wounds between a mother and daughter, and teaches them the two most important lessons of their lives.
  • FAIR GAME: Or the Importance of Being Honest / A Musical Comedy of Manners Based on a True Story about Fake News
    FAIR GAME is a cautionary tale that invokes stylistic elements of Oscar Wilde, Agatha Christie and Kurt Weill to tell the stories of five real-life people who penned falsehoods that haunt the legacy of Winchester rifle heiress Sarah Winchester. A mysterious host traps the three reporters and two entrepreneurs in a graveyard behind Winchester’s reputedly haunted mansion, where they are confronted with their...
    FAIR GAME is a cautionary tale that invokes stylistic elements of Oscar Wilde, Agatha Christie and Kurt Weill to tell the stories of five real-life people who penned falsehoods that haunt the legacy of Winchester rifle heiress Sarah Winchester. A mysterious host traps the three reporters and two entrepreneurs in a graveyard behind Winchester’s reputedly haunted mansion, where they are confronted with their mistruths, printed in their own 1920s, '30s and '40s newspaper articles that flaunt their cavalier attitudes toward spreading misinformation. Their host plants clues that reveal they cannot leave the graveyard until they atone for their roles in perpetuating baseless rumors about Sarah Winchester. Will they earn their freedom?
  • Feeding the Furies
    Aspirations run amok when Ruthie and Marty Furie set out to live the 1960s American Dream that glorifies upward mobility, domineering husbands, and obedient wives and children. Marty gets a promotion and moves the family to the suburbs. As the audience eavesdrops on the Furies’ hilarious restaurant conversations it becomes apparent that Ruthie and Marty, and their children, Mindy and Robbie, all hunger for more...
    Aspirations run amok when Ruthie and Marty Furie set out to live the 1960s American Dream that glorifies upward mobility, domineering husbands, and obedient wives and children. Marty gets a promotion and moves the family to the suburbs. As the audience eavesdrops on the Furies’ hilarious restaurant conversations it becomes apparent that Ruthie and Marty, and their children, Mindy and Robbie, all hunger for more than what's on the menu. Ruthie craves respect and freedom. She feels trapped playing the “ideal” housewife and mother and she's jealous of Mindy, who gets to go away to college and pursue a career. Marty craves obedience. He exploits his roles of "the good provider" and "head of the household" as entitlements to bully everyone. Mindy and Robbie crave their parents' love and approval, yet boldly challenge their parents' self-defeating views about honesty, normalcy, and conformance to social expectations. They also steadfastly remain true to their natures, despite Ruthie's and Marty's attempts to crush Mindy's feminist ideals, and Marty's refusal to accept Robbie's homosexuality. Sympathies shift between Ruthie and Marty after Marty has a stroke and Ruthie takes control with a vengeance. Mindy and Robbie ultimately accept that Ruthie and Marty are emotionally incapable of being nurturing spouses or parents, and distance themselves from their passive-aggressive mother and tyrannical father. Ruthie and Marty finally recognize the void they created between themselves and their children.
  • Violin Lessons
    Sharon Levi-Schwartz's rediscovery of a Stradivarius stolen by the Nazis sets off a confrontation that results in creating a bond between Sharon, who believes the violin belonged to her grandfather, and DeShawn Smith, a young Black violin prodigy.
  • Tap, Chip or Strip?
    A cashier dismisses the claim that chip technology provides credit card security, oblivious to all of the personal information she constantly reveals about herself.
  • A Change of Heart
    Tia and Marie aren't sure how to explain the bizarre changes in their mother's behavior, but whatever the cause may be, they're not complaining!
  • Countdown
    A junior high school geek chooses between being cool and doing the right thing.