India Kotis

India Kotis

India Kotis is a playwright and anthropologist, chiefly interested in why and how the meanings of things change.

Plays include PHILIA (James E. Michael Prize in Playwriting, Young Playwrights, Inc. National Competition); THE TANGIBLES (Playscripts); HERE BE MONSTERS (G45 Productions); and THE SECRET LIFE OF BICYCLES (The Blank), among others. Her work has been developed, produced, and recognized...
India Kotis is a playwright and anthropologist, chiefly interested in why and how the meanings of things change.

Plays include PHILIA (James E. Michael Prize in Playwriting, Young Playwrights, Inc. National Competition); THE TANGIBLES (Playscripts); HERE BE MONSTERS (G45 Productions); and THE SECRET LIFE OF BICYCLES (The Blank), among others. Her work has been developed, produced, and recognized by The UCross Foundation, The Blank Theatre, The Tank, The Road Theatre, The Secret City at Dixon Place, The 24 Hour Plays Nationals, Young Playwrights Inc., Manhattan Repertory Theatre, G45 Productions, Rascal Arts, The Scholastic Awards, The Drama Bookshop, The Alliance for Jewish Theatre, and Downtown Art.

She has performed with Dzieci Theatre Company, and can be seen in Marjorie Prime (2017), Cymbeline (2014), and Michael Almereyda's Hamlet. Her academic research, most recently a study of sex and gender categories in Umayyad Iberia, has been published in The Macksey Journal, of Johns Hopkins University, and The Lambda Alpha Journal. She was a contributing editor at the celebrated science literary journal Lyceum for several years, where she focused on the intersections between science and politics. Kotis's numerous accolades include the Robert L. Baker Prize in History, the Margaret Mead Award for Excellence in Anthropology, the Muriel B. Kahrl Award for studies in American Women's Culture, Young Playwrights Inc.'s National Competition, and the James E. Michael Prize in Playwriting.

Plays

  • BISEXUAL SADNESS
    BISEXUAL SADNESS is about what it sounds like. Faye is getting married to a man. The best man. A man whom she loves and who loves her. But as Faye prepares to marry him, she begins to grieve. The community that embraced her when she was the girlfriend of Genevieve, the sturdy, charming butch who helmed her college’s LGBT scene, has taken on an attitude of something halfway between resentment and indifference....
    BISEXUAL SADNESS is about what it sounds like. Faye is getting married to a man. The best man. A man whom she loves and who loves her. But as Faye prepares to marry him, she begins to grieve. The community that embraced her when she was the girlfriend of Genevieve, the sturdy, charming butch who helmed her college’s LGBT scene, has taken on an attitude of something halfway between resentment and indifference. It’s breaking Faye’s heart. When Faye’s older sister Miranda, whose cheating-scoundrel husband has recently left her for a woman half her age moves in along with Faye’s niece Naomi, a precocious 12-year-old questioning their gender, deeper themes of identity, choice, and intergenerational change emerge.

    BISEXUAL SADNESS is about the inconvenience of fluidity, the legacy of recently-assimilated marginalized identity, and the uncomfortable tensions between personal and social identity. Faye has reaped the benefits of the gay rights movement and used it to marry a man. Now she’s suffering the consequences.

    Deftly illustrating bisexual women’s fragile place within contemporary queer communities alongside universal questions of love and belonging, BISEXUAL SADNESS is a play for the progressive 21st century in all its liberated, solipsistic glory. Faye’s mourning is cringe. It’s B.S. It’s Bisexual Sadness.
  • Nights of Broken Glass
    Paula’s mother has died. Her husband has left her. Despondent and with minimal choices, Paula moves into her late mother’s apartment with Dierdre, the blonde-haired, blue-eyed WASP she met in a grief support group. Having given up her career as a photographer to get married and have children over a decade ago, Paula, a daughter of Jewish East Harlem, grapples with the disparity between how she wanted her life...
    Paula’s mother has died. Her husband has left her. Despondent and with minimal choices, Paula moves into her late mother’s apartment with Dierdre, the blonde-haired, blue-eyed WASP she met in a grief support group. Having given up her career as a photographer to get married and have children over a decade ago, Paula, a daughter of Jewish East Harlem, grapples with the disparity between how she wanted her life to pan out and then what actually happened. Nights of Broken Glass is a play about living with the legacies of our choices, the compromises we make for security, and the bitterness of other people's success. In other words: One woman’s mid-forties in the mid- ‘60s in Harlem.
  • The Secret Life of Bicycles
    When Julia's girlfriend Vicki suffers a sexual assault and her Russian immigrant mother moves in with them indefinitely, the two must re-learn how navigate intimacy, togetherness, and trust. The Secret Life of Bicycles takes an unflinching look at the ways we fail each other, even as we love each other, through the very worst moments of our lives.
  • Sybille of Harrogate
    Sybille, a recent Barnard grad, returns to the disintegrating town of Harrogate, Massachusetts, to care for her ailing father; a fisherman dying of Alzheimers. Armed with irrelevant cultural assumptions, unprocessed grief, and panic about oncoming environmental disaster, Sybille attempts to reform the town during the off-season while reconnecting with former playmates who regard the elites who flood their...
    Sybille, a recent Barnard grad, returns to the disintegrating town of Harrogate, Massachusetts, to care for her ailing father; a fisherman dying of Alzheimers. Armed with irrelevant cultural assumptions, unprocessed grief, and panic about oncoming environmental disaster, Sybille attempts to reform the town during the off-season while reconnecting with former playmates who regard the elites who flood their hometown each summer with condescension. Sybille of Harrogate explores themes of collective memory + class tensions; and it questions our common responsibilities about the possible end of the world.
  • The Tangibles
    It's Saturday night in New York City. High school is almost over, and Raina's throwing a post-breakup pity party. But when her friends arrive, they bring along problems of their own, and the night soon becomes a disappointment free-for-all of unrequited love, rejected college applications, delicate identity politics, and ukulele jams. Can this group of artsy teens set aside their personal fears about...
    It's Saturday night in New York City. High school is almost over, and Raina's throwing a post-breakup pity party. But when her friends arrive, they bring along problems of their own, and the night soon becomes a disappointment free-for-all of unrequited love, rejected college applications, delicate identity politics, and ukulele jams. Can this group of artsy teens set aside their personal fears about the future long enough to connect with one another?
  • PHILIA
    Thomas has a secret.