Ricardo Soltero-Brown

Ricardo Soltero-Brown

Ricardo Soltero-Brown is a playwright, actor, and director. He graduated from University of South Florida where he staged THE JACKET and was an apprentice at Horizon Theatre Company where THE AMBASSADOR, OR: THE DISARMAMENT OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS and NOTHING BUT CHEESE were performed. His plays include JEALOUSY (Winner of the Florida Playwrights Competition, Valencia College; Orlando International Fringe Theatre...
Ricardo Soltero-Brown is a playwright, actor, and director. He graduated from University of South Florida where he staged THE JACKET and was an apprentice at Horizon Theatre Company where THE AMBASSADOR, OR: THE DISARMAMENT OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS and NOTHING BUT CHEESE were performed. His plays include JEALOUSY (Winner of the Florida Playwrights Competition, Valencia College; Orlando International Fringe Theatre Festival), BELDAM & GAFFER (Pipsqueak Collective), THE LAST PLAY (Jeremy Seghers); virtual productions of DISCUSSION PANEL (Aggregate Sound), TO THE TEST (Quarantine Players), THERE IT IS (Momentum Stage); and staged readings of THE PRINCESS OF CASPIA (Dixon Place), GRIEF (RHCR Theatre; Focal Theatre Lab; Luna Stage Company), SICK DAY (Dramatists Guild Equality Festival, freeFall Theatre). He is a member of the Dramatists Guild of America.

Recommended by Ricardo Soltero-Brown

  • Impossible Friends (In Progress)
    11 Dec. 2020
    Eytan Deray has written a short brimming with the unseen history of two friends experiencing an intimate, truthful, vulnerable moment together. Idiosyncracies, emotions, and levels of self-esteem are all clear and playing out until their unique love which is now being put to the test either has the life taken out of it or proves it can support them both.
  • THE FUNCTION OF PEBBLES
    11 Dec. 2020
    Rachael Carnes uses her talents of crafting modern parables, anxious dialogue, and eye for unusual theatrical settings to meditate on the brutal circumstances which engender ennui. Two plastic moles in an arcade whack-a-mole gaming machine do their best to improve their prison into something at least somewhat resembling a home through aspiring for a mere modicum of comfort, but as their efforts are constantly in threat of (quite literally) reality coming in to hit them on the head, they ponder on a life after escape. Whether they come to thwart their dreams by daydreaming is where the acting can soar.
  • Matthew Weaver's First Kiss
    11 Dec. 2020
    Matthew Weaver's 'Matthew Weaver's First Kiss' is as much of a meta-play as Matthew Weaver has ever written a meta-play as ever a meta-play written by Matthew Weaver can get. What begins with enthusiastic flourish quickly amends expectations with narrative sleight-of-hand, suggesting exciting potential to become a sly game, with comedy coming from character elements variously dark, mischievous, naive, but differing in degrees depending. Matthew Weaver continues to explore the universal and timeless rite of passage that is a first kiss, and here he muses so close enough that his play kisses the moment's both lack and abundance of meaning.
  • Stupid Fucking Bird
    12 Nov. 2020
    A sly, subversive, sensitively focused modern take on the classic, timeless, and universal dynamics between a group of people gathered at a countryside estate. Certainly the existential and romantic tribulations are updated in a way to engage those unfamiliar with Chekhov, but will also prove to be a worthy translation to those versed in his devastating play. The central relationship of Con and Nina packs the crucial, poignant, relevant themes of love, loss, and sadness; however, the role of Masha gets a considerable opportunity to present a rejuvenated and deeply moving juxtaposition to the audience for them and the rest.
  • VULTURE GIRL: A HALLOWEEN MONOLOGUE
    19 Oct. 2020
    Wyndham's 'Vulture Girl', written to be performed by a child actor, stumbles upon a girl asserting her right to choose what she wears for Halloween. Confronting her mother - who decided earlier upon a different costume - leads to larger issues regarding identity, expression, and autonomy. The daughter makes a case so grand, I'm not sure she's aware she's making it; it seems beyond her years, yet here she is saying every word and each one is true. (Well, there's a mistake, not a lie.) Genuinely upset in moments, her own costume ends up helping her intimidating, err...impressive argument.